Conductivity of polyolefins filled with high-structure carbon black

Authors

  • J. Yu,

    1. Department of Macromolecular Science and Center for Applied Polymer Research, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106-7202
    Current affiliation:
    1. Ciba Specialty Chemicals, Tarrytown, NY 10591
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  • L. Q. Zhang,

    1. Department of Macromolecular Science and Center for Applied Polymer Research, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106-7202
    Current affiliation:
    1. Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing, China
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  • M. Rogunova,

    1. Department of Macromolecular Science and Center for Applied Polymer Research, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106-7202
    Current affiliation:
    1. PolyOne Corp., Avon Lake, OH 44012
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  • J. Summers,

    1. PolyOne Corporation, Avon Lake, Ohio 44012
    Current affiliation:
    1. P3 Consultants, Bay Village, OH 44140
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  • A. Hiltner,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Macromolecular Science and Center for Applied Polymer Research, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106-7202
    • Department of Macromolecular Science and Center for Applied Polymer Research, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106-7202
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  • E. Baer

    1. Department of Macromolecular Science and Center for Applied Polymer Research, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106-7202
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Abstract

The electrical conductivities of various polyolefins filled with a high-structure carbon black (CB) were studied. Typical percolation behaviors were observed in all of the materials studied. At a critical CB content, which defined the percolation threshold, CB formed conductivity pathways, and resistivity fell sharply from a value characteristic of an insulator into the range of 10–100 Ω cm. The dependence of the percolation threshold on the matrix viscosity was understood in terms of competing effects on CB dispersion during blending and CB flocculation during compression molding. For the conditions used in this study, polypropylene with a melt flow index of about 50 was optimum. Flocculation in the quiescent melt was studied directly by atomic force microscopy. Conductivity pathways formed over time by CB agglomeration. The temperature dependence of the percolation time was described by an Arrhenius relationship. © 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Appl Polym Sci 98: 1799–1805, 2005

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