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Effect of starch addition on compression-molded poly(3-hydroxybutyrate)/starch blends

Authors

  • Rossana M. S. M. Thiré,

    Corresponding author
    1. Instituto de Macromoléculas Professora Eloisa Mano, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, 21945–970 Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
    Current affiliation:
    1. PEMM/COPPE, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janiero, PO Box 68505, 21945–970 Rio de Janiero, Brazil
    • Instituto de Macromoléculas Professora Eloisa Mano, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, 21945–970 Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
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  • Thiago A. A. Ribeiro,

    1. Instituto de Macromoléculas Professora Eloisa Mano, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, 21945–970 Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
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  • Cristina T. Andrade

    1. Instituto de Macromoléculas Professora Eloisa Mano, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, 21945–970 Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
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Abstract

Because of their biocompatibility and total biodegradability, poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) and starch have attracted attention as promising raw materials for manufacture of single-use plastic items and biomaterials. PHB/maize starch blends with starch contents in the range of 0–50 wt % were processed in an internal mixer, and their compression-molded films were characterized by tensile tests, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, wettability measurements, and scanning electron microscopy. Water and glycerol were used as plasticizers. The results indicated that the thermal degradation behavior of the blends were similar to that of pure PHB films. All the blends showed heterogeneous morphology, wherein starch granules were dispersed in continuous PHB-rich matrix. Despite the decrease in elongation at break and tensile strength, starch incorporation of up to 30 wt % into PHB matrix resulted in materials as hard as pure PHB films, but exhibiting less crystallinity and more hydrophilic character, which might lead to a higher biodegradation rate. © 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Appl Polym Sci 100: 4338–4347, 2006

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