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Micromechanical properties of injection-molded starch–wood particle composites

Authors

  • A. Ueberschaer,

    1. Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Serrano 119, E-28006 Madrid, Spain
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  • M. E. Cagiao,

    1. Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Serrano 119, E-28006 Madrid, Spain
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  • R K. Bayer,

    1. Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Serrano 119, E-28006 Madrid, Spain
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  • S. Henning,

    1. Institute of Materials Science, Martin-Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, D-06099 Halle/Saale, Germany
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  • F. J. Baltá Calleja

    Corresponding author
    1. Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Serrano 119, E-28006 Madrid, Spain
    Current affiliation:
    1. Institut für Werkstofftechnik, Universität Kassel, Mönchebergstrasse 3, D-34125 Kassel, Germany
    • Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Serrano 119, E-28006 Madrid, Spain
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Abstract

The micromechanical properties of injection-molded starch–wood particle composites were investigated as a function of particle content and humidity conditions. The composite materials were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction methods. The microhardness of the composites was shown to increase notably with the concentration of the wood particles. In addition, creep behavior under the indenter and temperature dependence were evaluated in terms of the independent contribution of the starch matrix and the wood microparticles to the hardness value. The influence of drying time on the density and weight uptake of the injection-molded composites was highlighted. The results revealed the role of the mechanism of water evaporation, showing that the dependence of water uptake and temperature was greater for the starch–wood composites than for the pure starch sample. Experiments performed during the drying process at 70°C indicated that the wood in the starch composites did not prevent water loss from the samples. © 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Appl Polym Sci 100: 4893–4899, 2006

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