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Effects of formaldehyde to urea mole ratio on thermal curing behavior of urea–formaldehyde resin and properties of particleboard

Authors

  • Byung-Dae Park,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Forest Products, Korea Forest Research Institute (KFRI), Dondaemun-gu, Seoul 130–712, Republic of Korea
    • Department of Forest Products, Korea Forest Research Institute (KFRI), Dondaemun-gu, Seoul 130–712, Republic of Korea
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  • Eun Chang Kang,

    1. Department of Forest Products, Korea Forest Research Institute (KFRI), Dondaemun-gu, Seoul 130–712, Republic of Korea
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  • Jong Yong Park

    1. Department of Forest Products, Korea Forest Research Institute (KFRI), Dondaemun-gu, Seoul 130–712, Republic of Korea
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Abstract

As a part of abating the formaldehyde emission (FE) of urea–formaldehyde (UF) resin, this study was conducted to investigate the effects of formaldehyde to urea (F/U) mole ratio on thermal curing behavior of UF resins and properties of PB bonded with them. UF resins synthesized at different F/U mole ratios (i.e., 1.6, 1.4, 1.2, and 1.0) were used for the manufacture of PB. Thermal curing behavior of these UF resins was characterized using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). As the F/U mole ratio decreases, the gel time, onset and peak temperatures, and heat of reaction (ΔH) increased, while the activation energy (Ea) and rate constant (k) were decreased. The amount of free formaldehyde of UF resin and FE of PB prepared decreased in parallel with decreasing the F/U mole ratio. The internal bond strength, thickness swelling, and water absorption of PB was slightly deteriorated with decreasing the F/U mole ratio of UF resins used. These results indicated that as the F/U mole ratio decreased, the FE of PB was greatly reduced at the expense of the reactivity of UF resin and slight deterioration of performance of PB prepared. © 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Appl Polym Sci 101: 1787–1792, 2006

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