Using isoconversional kinetic analysis of liquid melamine–formaldehyde resin curing to predict laminate surface properties

Authors

  • A. Kandelbauer,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Wood Science and Technology, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Peter Jordan Strasse 82, A-1190 Vienna, Austria
    • Department of Wood Science and Technology, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Peter Jordan Strasse 82, A-1190 Vienna, Austria
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  • G. Wuzella,

    1. Wood Carinthian Competence Centre, Kompetenzzentrum Holz GmbH, Klagenfurterstrasse 87-89, A-9300 St. Veit an der Glan, Austria
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  • A. Mahendran,

    1. Wood Carinthian Competence Centre, Kompetenzzentrum Holz GmbH, Klagenfurterstrasse 87-89, A-9300 St. Veit an der Glan, Austria
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  • I. Taudes,

    1. Wood Carinthian Competence Centre, Kompetenzzentrum Holz GmbH, Klagenfurterstrasse 87-89, A-9300 St. Veit an der Glan, Austria
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  • P. Widsten

    1. Wood Carinthian Competence Centre, Kompetenzzentrum Holz GmbH, Klagenfurterstrasse 87-89, A-9300 St. Veit an der Glan, Austria
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Abstract

The curing kinetics of a liquid melamine–formaldehyde impregnation resin were analyzed with differential scanning calorimetry, and the conversion-dependent activation energy for melamine–formaldehyde curing was estimated with the isoconversional model-free kinetic approach developed by Vyazovkin. The conversion-dependent activation energy was used to extend the predictive power of a response surface model describing the influence of some processing factors (press time and resin composition) in the manufacturing of particleboards coated with melamine–formaldehyde-impregnated papers. By substituting the factor “press time” in an RSM established for a press temperature of 170 °C by the factor “conversion” which is accessible from thermo-chemical analysis, additional information on temperature was incorporated into the model. Model applicability for additional temperatures was evaluated with 12 validation experiments. Although chemical resistance was difficult to model, cleanability was sufficiently well described by only one factor (conversion). Surface gloss depended on both the conversion and catalyst amount and was predicted by a two-factor interaction model (R2 = 0.95). This study demonstrates that parameters derived from the isoconversional kinetic analysis of liquid resins not only are theoretical descriptors but also have direct practical relevance in the modeling of product properties derived from these liquid resins when used to supplement technological databases. © 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Appl Polym Sci, 2009

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