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Synthesis and characterization of pH- and salt-responsive hydrogels based on etherificated sodium alginate

Authors

  • Hailin Lin,

    1. Department of Biological Systems Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 460 Henry Mall, Madison 53706, WI
    2. Department of Chemical Engineering, Zhongkai University of Agriculture and Engineering, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510225, People's Republic of China
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  • Jinjin Zhou,

    1. Department of Biological Systems Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 460 Henry Mall, Madison 53706, WI
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  • Cui Yingde,

    1. Department of Chemical Engineering, Zhongkai University of Agriculture and Engineering, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510225, People's Republic of China
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  • Sundaram Gunasekaran

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Biological Systems Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 460 Henry Mall, Madison 53706, WI
    • Department of Biological Systems Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 460 Henry Mall, Madison 53706, WI
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Abstract

Hydrogels composed of etherificated sodium alginate (ESA), sodium acrylic acid (NaAA), and poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA) were synthesized by aqueous solution polymerization. The effects of reaction variables such as terminal pH, ions, and ionic strength on hydrogel swelling ratio (SR) were determined and compared. SR was influenced strongly by pH and ionic strength. SR increased with increasing pH but tended to decrease with PVA content. At a given ionic strength, SR of ESA/NaAA/PVA hydrogel was dependent on the valence of anion; SR was higher in multivalent anion salt solution than in monovalent anion salt solution, i.e., SRK2SO4 > SRKCl and SRNa2SO4 > SRNaCl. The swelling kinetic of the hydrogels showed Fickian kinetic diffusion in acidic media and non-Fickian behavior in alkaline media. © 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Appl Polym Sci, 2010

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