High shear strain rate rheometry of polymer melts

Authors

  • A. L. Kelly,

    Corresponding author
    1. IRC in Polymer Engineering, School of Engineering, Design and Technology, University of Bradford, West Yorkshire, Bradford BD7 1DP, United Kingdom
    • IRC in Polymer Engineering, School of Engineering, Design and Technology, University of Bradford, West Yorkshire, Bradford BD7 1DP, United Kingdom
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  • T. Gough,

    1. IRC in Polymer Engineering, School of Engineering, Design and Technology, University of Bradford, West Yorkshire, Bradford BD7 1DP, United Kingdom
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  • B. R. Whiteside,

    1. IRC in Polymer Engineering, School of Engineering, Design and Technology, University of Bradford, West Yorkshire, Bradford BD7 1DP, United Kingdom
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  • P. D. Coates

    1. IRC in Polymer Engineering, School of Engineering, Design and Technology, University of Bradford, West Yorkshire, Bradford BD7 1DP, United Kingdom
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Abstract

The rheology of a range of polymer melts has been measured at strain rates above those attained during conventional rheometry using an instrumented injection molding machine. Deviations from shear thinning behavior were observed at high rates, and previously unreported shear thickening behavior occurred for some of the polymers examined. Measured pressure and volumetric throughputs were used to calculate shear and extensional viscosity at wall shear strain rates up to 107 s−1. Parallel plate rheometry and twin bore capillary rheometry were used to provide comparative rheological data at low and medium shear strain rates, respectively. Commercial grades of polyethylene, polypropylene, polystyrene, and PMMA were studied. Measured shear viscosity was found to follow Newtonian behavior at low rates and shear thinning power law behavior at intermediate strain rates. At shear strain rates approaching or above 106 s−1, shear viscosity reached a rate-independent plateau, and in some cases shear thickened with further increase in strain rate. A relationship between the measured high strain rate rheological behavior and molecular structure was noted, with polymers containing larger side groups reaching the rate-independent plateau at lower strain rates than those with simpler structures. © 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Appl Polym Sci, 2009

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