Get access
Advertisement

Tensile tests of phenol formaldehyde glass-powder-reinforced composites: Pilot study

Authors

  • H. Ku,

    Corresponding author
    1. Faculty of Engineering and Surveying, University of Southern Queensland, West Street, Toowoomba 4350, Australia
    2. Centre of Excellence in Engineered Fibre Composites, University of Southern Queensland, Australia
    • Faculty of Engineering and Surveying, University of Southern Queensland, West Street, Toowoomba 4350, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • M. Trada,

    1. Faculty of Engineering and Surveying, University of Southern Queensland, West Street, Toowoomba 4350, Australia
    2. Centre of Excellence in Engineered Fibre Composites, University of Southern Queensland, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • T. Cecil,

    1. Faculty of Engineering and Surveying, University of Southern Queensland, West Street, Toowoomba 4350, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • P. Wong

    1. Faculty of Engineering and Surveying, University of Southern Queensland, West Street, Toowoomba 4350, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

Phenol formaldehyde was filled with glass powder (GP) to optimize the strength and impact toughness of the composite for structural applications by a research center at the University of Southern Queensland. To reduce costs, the center wished to fill as much of the glass microspheres as possible to maintain sufficient strength and impact toughness in the composites in structural applications. In this project, we varied the weight percentages of the GP in the composites, which were then subjected to tensile tests. The best weight percentage of GP that could be added to the phenolic resin to give the optimum yield, tensile strengths, Young's modulus, and cost was found to be about 10%. The contribution of this study was the finding that if the tensile properties are the most important factors to be considered in the applications of the composites, GP is not a suitable filler. © 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Appl Polym Sci, 2010

Get access to the full text of this article

Ancillary