Degradation and initiation polymerization mechanism of α-methylstyrene-containing macroinitiators

Authors

  • Shan Jiang,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Jiangsu Polytechnic University, Changzhou 213016, People's Republic of China
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  • Jianping Deng,

    1. State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029, People's Republic of China
    2. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029, People's Republic of China
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  • Qiang Yu,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Jiangsu Polytechnic University, Changzhou 213016, People's Republic of China
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  • Wantai Yang

    Corresponding author
    1. State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029, People's Republic of China
    2. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029, People's Republic of China
    • State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029, People's Republic of China
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Abstract

Copolymers obtained from radical copolymerization of α-methylstyrene (AMS) and glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) behave as macroinitiators, when heated in the presence of a second monomer, giving rise to block copolymers. The relevant degradation and initiation polymerization mechanism of the macroinitiators were studied. Thermal depropagation of the macroinitiators generated monomers, identified by 1H-NMR, photoionization mass spectroscopy and FT-IR. According to the results of structure analysis by GPC, ESR and NMR spectroscopy, the AMS-GMA (head-head) and AMS-AMS (head-head) bonds in the macroinitiators are easily scissored providing free radicals when the temperature is above 80°C. The radicals lead to subsequent polymerization of the second monomer, and thereby block copolymers are formed. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Appl Polym Sci, 2011

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