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Effect of high temperature and the role of sulfate on adsorption behavior and effectiveness of AMPS®-based cement fluid loss polymers

Authors

  • Nils Recalde Lummer,

    1. Chair for Construction Chemicals, Institute for Inorganic Chemistry, Technische Universität München, Garching, Germany
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  • Fatima Dugonjić-Bilić,

    1. Chair for Construction Chemicals, Institute for Inorganic Chemistry, Technische Universität München, Garching, Germany
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  • Johann Plank

    Corresponding author
    1. Chair for Construction Chemicals, Institute for Inorganic Chemistry, Technische Universität München, Garching, Germany
    • Chair for Construction Chemicals, Institute for Inorganic Chemistry, Technische Universität München, Garching, Germany
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Abstract

The fluid loss control performance of 2-acrylamido-2-methylpropane sulfonic acid (AMPS®)-based copolymers added to cement slurries was studied at 27 and 100°C, respectively. It was found that effectiveness of these fluid loss additives solely relies on achievement of a high adsorbed amount on the surface of cement. At elevated temperature (100°C), CaAMPS®-N,N-dimethyl acrylamide copolymer (CaAMPS®-co-NNDMA) exhibits reduced adsorption and hence decreased fluid loss control of the cement slurry. The reason behind this behavior is poor calcium binding capability of the sulfonate anchor groups, which coordinate with calcium atoms present on the mineral surface. Whereas, an increase in the sulfate concentration present in cement pore solution instigates partial coiling of CaAMPS®-co-NNDMA and causes only a slight influence on the performance of this copolymer. The elevated sulfate content results from thermal degradation of ettringite, a cement hydrate mineral produced during the early stages of cement hydration. Incorporation of minor amounts (∼ 1.3 mol %) of maleic anhydride into this copolymer produces a terpolymer, which exhibits higher and more stable adsorption, even at high temperature. This effect is owed to the presence of homopolymer blocks of polycarboxylates distributed along the polymer trunk. On mineral surfaces, they present much stronger anchor groups than sulfonate functionalities, as evidenced by their higher calcium binding capability. Consequently, fluid loss performance of CaAMPS®-co-NNDMA-co-MA is little affected by temperature. Understanding the influence of temperature on the physicochemical interactions occurring between additives and the mineral surface can help to design more effective admixtures suitable for high temperature applications. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Appl Polym Sci, 2011

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