Effect of Ni2+ as a codopant on the structure, morphology, and conductivity of nanostructured polyaniline

Authors

  • Man Jiang,

    1. Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031, People's Republic of China
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  • Shibu Zhu,

    1. Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031, People's Republic of China
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  • Zuowan Zhou,

    Corresponding author
    1. Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031, People's Republic of China
    • Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031, People's Republic of China===

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  • An Zhao,

    1. Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031, People's Republic of China
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  • Jun Lu

    1. Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031, People's Republic of China
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Abstract

One-dimensional nanostructures of polyaniline (PANI) doped with (1S)-(+)-10-camphorsulfonic acid (D-CSA) alone and with NiCl2 as a codopant were synthesized via in situ polymerization. PANI nanofibers with diameters of about 200 nm were formed when PANI was doped with D-CSA only. When NiCl2 was added as a codopant, the morphology of PANI obviously changed. The effects and related mechanisms were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma–atomic emission spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction, and the results indicated that Ni2+ destroyed the micelles' structure by chemical conjunction with [BOND]SO3H groups in camphorsulfonic acid (CSA) molecules, which were the key component in forming the CSA–aniline micelles. The combination between Ni2+ and SOmath formula in CSA with a lower addition of Ni2+ led to a reduction of CSA doping to PANI, but a higher loading of Ni2+ brought about the direct doping of Ni2+ to PANI, which caused a higher degree of doping and oxidation. The conductivity of PANI increased almost linearly with increasing Ni2+. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Appl Polym Sci, 2011

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