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Glycerol citrate polyesters produced through heating without catalysis

Authors

  • Brent Tisserat,

    Corresponding author
    1. Functional Foods Research Unit, National Center for Agricultural Research, Agricultural Research Service, United States Department of Agriculture, Peoria, Illinois 61604
    • Functional Foods Research Unit, National Center for Agricultural Research, Agricultural Research Service, United States Department of Agriculture, Peoria, Illinois 61604
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  • Rogers Harry O'kuru,

    1. Bio-Oils Research Unit, National Center for Agricultural Research, Agricultural Research Service, United States Department of Agriculture, Peoria, Illinois 61604
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  • HongSik Hwang,

    1. Functional Foods Research Unit, National Center for Agricultural Research, Agricultural Research Service, United States Department of Agriculture, Peoria, Illinois 61604
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  • Abdellatif A. Mohamed,

    1. Department of Food Science, King Saud Univeristy, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia
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  • Ronald Holser

    1. Richard Russell Research Center, Agricultural Research Service, United States Department of Agriculture, Athens, Georgia 30605
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Abstract

The influence of various heating methods without catalysis to prepare polyesters from citric acid : glycerol blends were studied. In the presence of short-term microwave treatments, i.e., 60 s at 1200 W, blends of glycerol and citric acid invariably formed solid amorphous polyesters. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed that citric acid and glycerol blends can form highly stable polymers composed of ester bonds. The glycerol citrate polyester polymers exhibited the least degradation in water, more in acid solutions (0.1–1.0M HCl), and the most deterioration in strong alkaline solutions (0.1–1.0M NaOH) after 72 h soakings. Polyesters of glycerol and citric acid were studied with differential scanning calorimetry and thermal gravimetric analysis. The polyesters were found to be thermally stable (up to 313°C). © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Appl Polym Sci, 2012

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