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A nonenzymatic hydrogen peroxide sensor based on Pt/PPy hollow hybrid microspheres

Authors

  • Yulin Li,

    1. Institute of Molecular Science, Key Laboratory of Chemical Biology of Molecular Engineering of Education Ministry, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006, China
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  • Yunzhen Chang,

    1. Institute of Molecular Science, Key Laboratory of Chemical Biology of Molecular Engineering of Education Ministry, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006, China
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  • Ming Jin,

    1. Institute of Molecular Science, Key Laboratory of Chemical Biology of Molecular Engineering of Education Ministry, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006, China
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  • Yanyun Liu,

    1. Institute of Molecular Science, Key Laboratory of Chemical Biology of Molecular Engineering of Education Ministry, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006, China
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  • Gaoyi Han

    Corresponding author
    1. Institute of Molecular Science, Key Laboratory of Chemical Biology of Molecular Engineering of Education Ministry, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006, China
    • Institute of Molecular Science, Key Laboratory of Chemical Biology of Molecular Engineering of Education Ministry, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006, China
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Abstract

The surface of silica particles was NH2[BOND] functionalized by 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane, then the platinum/polypyrrole hybrid hollow microspheres were prepared by treating the SiO2 template decorated by the H2PtCl6 via the NH2[BOND] group with pyrrole vapor and developed as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) sensor. The platinum/polypyrrole hybrid hollow sphere materials were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and infrared spectroscopy, and the catalytic electrodes were investigated by electrochemical method. The results showed that the nonenzymatic sensor displayed a good electro-catalytic response and high sensitivity to the oxidation of H2O2, and the resulting sensor showed a wide linear range from 1.9 to 9.7 mM H2O2. The obvious response could be still observed in i–t curve when the concentration of H2O2 was as low as 1.0 μM. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Appl Polym Sci, 2012

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