Mechanical, morphological, and thermal properties of chemically treated pine needles reinforced thermosetting composites

Authors

  • Amar Singh Singha,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemistry, Applied Chemistry Research Laboratory, National Institute of Technology, Hamirpur 177005, Himachal Pradesh, India
    • Department of Chemistry, Applied Chemistry Research Laboratory, National Institute of Technology, Hamirpur 177005, Himachal Pradesh, India
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  • Aishwarya Jyoti

    1. Department of Chemistry, Applied Chemistry Research Laboratory, National Institute of Technology, Hamirpur 177005, Himachal Pradesh, India
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Errata

This article is corrected by:

  1. Errata: Mechanical, morphological, and thermal properties of chemically treated pine needles reinforced thermosetting composites Volume 129, Issue 3, 1642, Article first published online: 8 April 2013

Abstract

Natural fibers are widely used as reinforcement in composites. Pine needles are one of the major biowaste generated by Pinus roxburgii plant. This species is found abundantly in the forests of Himachal Pradesh. In this work, composites of urea–resorcinol–formaldehyde resin-reinforced with Pine needles fibers were prepared. Fibers were chemically modified to improve their compatibility with matrix. These fibers were mercerized with NaOH solution and acetylated to increase their hydrophobic character. The chemically modified fibers were characterized with Fourier transform infrared spectra, 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The composites were prepared with treated and untreated fibers containing 30% fibers by weight using compression molding technique. The morphology of the materials thus obtained was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy. The chemical modifications of fibers improve fiber–matrix adhesion and also have markedly effect on mechanical properties of composites. Moreover, the thermal resistance of these composites was improved on chemical modification. These results indicate that chemically modified fibers exhibit better compatibility with the polymer matrix than that of untreated fiber. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J. Appl. Polym. Sci, 2013

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