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Synthesis of nanosized ethylene–propylene rubber latex via polyisoprene hydrogenation

Authors

  • Anong Kongsinlark,

    1. Program in Petrochemistry and Polymer Science, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330, Thailand
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  • Garry L. Rempel,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L3G1
    • Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L3G1
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  • Pattarapan Prasassarakich

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemical Technology, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330, Thailand
    2. Center for Excellence on Petrochemical and Materials Technology, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330, Thailand
    • Department of Chemical Technology, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330, Thailand
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Abstract

Nanosized ethylene–propylene rubber (EPM) latex with a particle size of 47 nm was synthesized via an alternative route consisting of isoprene (IP) polymerization followed by hydrogenation. First, the IP monomer was polymerized by differential microemulsion polymerization to obtain polyisoprene (PIP) rubber latex with a particle size of 42 nm. The structure of synthetic PIP was hydrogenated at the carbon–carbon double bonds to produce an ethylene–propylene copolymer by diimide reduction in the presence of hydrazine and hydrogen peroxide using boric acid as promotor. The degree of hydrogenation was determined by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) spectroscopy and the structure of the ethylene–propylene copolymer was identified by 13C-NMR spectroscopy. In nanosized PIP hydrogenation, the hydrogenation level was found to be increased by boric acid addition. An EPM yield of 94% was achieved using a hydrogen peroxide : hydrazine ratio of 1.5 : 1. The EPM produced from PIP has high thermal stability with the maximum decomposition temperature of 510°C and a glass transition temperature of -42.4°C close to commercial ethylene–propylene diene rubber. Dynamic mechanical analysis indicated that EPM had a maximum storage modulus due to the saturated carbons domains of the ethylene segments in the polymer chains. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J. Appl. Polym. Sci., 2013

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