Synthesis of poly(oligo(ethylene glycol)methacrylate)-functionalized membranes for thermally controlled drug delivery

Authors

  • Francisco Teixeira Jr.,

    1. Laboratory for Protection and Physiology, Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Lerchenfeldstrasse 5, St. Gallen, 9014, Switzerland
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  • Ana Maria Popa,

    Corresponding author
    1. Laboratory for Protection and Physiology, Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Lerchenfeldstrasse 5, St. Gallen, 9014, Switzerland
    • Laboratory for Protection and Physiology, Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Lerchenfeldstrasse 5, St. Gallen, 9014, Switzerland
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  • Sébastien Guimond,

    1. Laboratory for Advanced Fibers, Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Lerchenfeldstrasse 5, St. Gallen, 9014, Switzerland
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  • Dirk Hegemann,

    1. Laboratory for Advanced Fibers, Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Lerchenfeldstrasse 5, St. Gallen, 9014, Switzerland
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  • René M. Rossi

    1. Laboratory for Protection and Physiology, Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Lerchenfeldstrasse 5, St. Gallen, 9014, Switzerland
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Abstract

In this work a robust method for grafting thermoresponsive poly(oligo(ethylene glycol) methacrylates) (pOEGMA) macromolecules from polymeric porous membranes and silicon surfaces is presented. Hydrophilic track-etched polyester (PETE) membranes with submicrometer pore sizes and silicon dies were submitted to a plasma treatment, which successfully allowed the introduction of anchoring groups and further grafting of the initiator on the surface. The surface-initiated polymerization of OEGMA was carried out by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP), yielding dense polymer brushes. Moreover, the temperature-controlled transport of caffeine through the functionalized membranes was demonstrated and the influence of the pore morphology and immobilized polymer layer thickness on the permeation profile was investigated. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J. Appl. Polym. Sci., 2013

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