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Electron beam and UV cationic polymerization of glycidyl ethers PART II: Reaction of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A

Authors

  • Matteo Mascioni,

    1. Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104
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  • Narendra N. Ghosh,

    1. Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104
    2. Department of Chemistry, Birla Institute of Technology and Science Pilani, KK Birla Goa Campus, Zuarinagar, Goa 403726, India
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  • James M. Sands,

    1. Materials and Manufacturing Sciences Division, US Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland 21005
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  • Giuseppe R. Palmese

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104
    • Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104
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Abstract

Electron-beam (e-beam) and ultraviolet (UV)-induced cationic polymerization of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) using the photo-initiator diaryliodonium hexafluoroantimonate was investigated using in situ NIR spectroscopy. The effect of processing parameters, such as temperature, radiation intensity, and photo-initiator concentration, on kinetics of the reaction were determined quantitatively. In contrast to the behavior of monofunctional epoxy systems reported previously, the difunctional epoxy forms a high Tg crosslinked network, so a kinetic model that takes into account diffusion limitations associated with vitrification was developed. The combined benefits of the real-time in situ NIR spectroscopy study and the well-defined diffusion model resulted in very accurate predictions for cure of epoxy networks by e-beam-induced polymerization. The results support the view that e-beam processing of epoxies is constrained by vitrification in the same way that UV and thermally cured epoxies are. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J. Appl. Polym. Sci., 2013

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