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Soundproofing properties of polypropylene/clay/carbon nanotube nanocomposites

Authors

  • Myung-Sub Kim,

    1. School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea
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  • Jun Yan,

    1. School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea
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  • Kyung-Min Kang,

    1. School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea
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  • Kyung-Hoon Joo,

    1. School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea
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  • Jitendra K. Pandey,

    1. Institute of Advanced Machinery and Design, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea
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  • Yeon-June Kang,

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea
    2. Institute of Advanced Machinery and Design, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea
    • Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Innovative Design and Integrated Manufacturing Lab, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea
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  • Sung-Hoon Ahn

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea
    2. Institute of Advanced Machinery and Design, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea
    • Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Innovative Design and Integrated Manufacturing Lab, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea
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Abstract

In this article, polypropylene (PP)/clay/carbon nanotube (CNT) composites were prepared via a solution blending method. Sound transmission loss (STL), determined with an impedance tube, was used to characterize their soundproofing properties. The STL for the PP/4.8 wt % clay/0.5 wt % CNT composite was about 15–21 dB higher than that for pure PP at high frequencies (3200–6400 Hz) and about 8–14 dB higher at low frequencies (580–620 Hz). X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to study the crystallinity and the microstructure. A synergistic effect on the STL was established between the structure of the homogeneous dispersion and strong interfacial adhesion. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J. Appl. Polym. Sci., 2013

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