Identification of alien predators that should not be removed for controlling invasive crayfish threatening endangered odonates

Authors

  • Moe Miyake,

    1. Laboratory of Biodiversity Science, School of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Tokyo, Yayoi, Tokyo 113-8656, Japan
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  • Tadashi Miyashita

    Corresponding author
    1. Laboratory of Biodiversity Science, School of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Tokyo, Yayoi, Tokyo 113-8656, Japan
    • Laboratory of Biodiversity Science, School of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Tokyo, Yayoi, Tokyo 113-8656, Japan
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Abstract

  • 1.When multiple invasive species coexist in the same ecosystem and their diets change as they grow, determining whether to eradicate any particular invader is difficult because of complex predator–prey interactions.
  • 2.A stable isotope food-web analysis was conducted to explore an appropriate management strategy for three potential alien predators (snakehead Channa argus, bullfrog Rana catesbeiana, red-eared slider turtle Trachemys scripta elegans) of invasive crayfish Procambarus clarkii that had severely reduced the densities of endangered odonates in a pond in Japan.
  • 3.The stable isotope analysis demonstrated that medium- and small-sized snakeheads primarily depended on crayfish and stone moroko Pseudorasbora parva. Both adult and juvenile bullfrogs depended on terrestrial arthropods, and juveniles exhibited a moderate dependence on crayfish. The turtle showed little dependence on crayfish.
  • 4.These results suggest that eradication of snakeheads risks the possibility of mesopredator release, while such risk appears to be low in other alien predators. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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