Two invaders achieve higher densities in reserves

Authors

  • Terrie Klinger,

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Marine Affairs, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98105-6715, USA
    • School of Marine Affairs, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98105-6715, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Dianna K. Padilla,

    1. Department of Ecology and Evolution, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5245, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Kevin Britton-Simmons

    1. Department of Ecology and Evolution, The University of Chicago, 1101 East 57th Street, Chicago, IL 60637, USA
    Current affiliation:
    1. Friday Harbor Laboratories, University of Washington, 620 University Road, Friday Harbor, WA 98250
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

  • 1.Invasive species threaten marine biodiversity on a global scale.
  • 2.To test whether marine reserves provide resistance to invading species, the abundance of two conspicuous invaders, a seaweed and an oyster, were measured inside marine reserves and in comparable areas outside reserves in north-western Washington State.
  • 3.Densities of both invaders were significantly higher in marine reserves than in comparable unprotected areas outside reserves. Although the causal mechanisms have not yet been identified, differential rates of human harvest do not appear to be responsible for the patterns observed.
  • 4.It is provisionally suggested that physical or biological aspects of the reserves themselves may directly or indirectly facilitate biological invasion.

Copyright © 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Ancillary