Genomic potential hypothesis of evolution: A concept of biogenesis in habitable spaces of the universe

Authors

  • Christian Schwabe

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina
    • Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Medical University of South Carolina, 171 Ashley Ave., Charleston, SC 29425
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Abstract

The new hypothesis of evolution establishes a contiguity of life sciences with cosmology, physics, and chemistry, and provides a basis for the search for life on other planets. Chemistry is the sole driving force of the assembly of life, under the subtle guidance exerted by bonding orbital geometry. That phenomenon leads to multiple origins that function on the same principles but are different to the extent that their nucleic acid core varies. Thus, thoughts about the origins of life and the development of complexity have been transferred from the chance orientation of the past to the realm of atomic structures, which are subject to the laws of thermodynamics and kinetics. Evolution is a legitimate subject of basic science, and the complexity of life will submit to the laws of chemistry and physics as the problem is viewed from a new perspective. The paradigm connects life to the big events that formed every sphere of our living space and that keeps conditions fine-tuned for life to persist, perhaps a billion years or more. The “genomic potential” hypothesis leads to the prediction that life like ours is likely to exist in galaxies that are as distant from the origin of the universe as the Milky Way, and that the habitable zone of our galaxy harbors other living planets as well. Anat Rec 268:171–179, 2002. © 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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