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Abstract

The effect of exogenous estrogen on tubal transport of ova was determined in the guinea pig, hamster, mouse, rabbit and rat. The animals were given a single injection of estradiol cyclopentylpropionate (ECP) shortly after mating. The dose of ECP required to interrupt pregnancy in 80% or more of the animals was as follows: guinea pig (10 μg); hamster (25 μg); mouse (1 μg); rabbit (50 μg); rat (10 μg). Acceleration of egg transport through the oviduct occurred after the following doses of ECP: guinea pig (50–100 μg); hamster (100 μg); mouse (1 μg and above); rabbit (25 μg); rat (10 μg and above). Hence, the amount of estrogen which accelerates egg transport in the guinea pig and hamster is considerably higher than the dose which interrupts pregnancy.

Retentionof ova for longer than the normal period of tubal passage (tube-locking) resulted from the following doses of ECP: guinea pig (250 μg); hamster (250 μg); mouse (1 μg); rabbit (100 μg); rat (no dose). In the species in which ova were tubelocked, the majority of eggs were located at the ampullary-isthmic junction rather than the utero-tubal region of the oviduct.

Tube-locking of ova was never observed in the rat; ECP always caused premature entry of eggs into the uterus and eventual expulsion per vaginam. For example, eggs passed through the cervix by 12 hours after the administration of 250 μg ECP at day 1 of pregnancy.