Hippocampal Subregions are Differentially Affected in the Progression to Alzheimer's Disease

Authors

  • Sarah J. Greene,

    1. Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington, Vermont 05405-0068
    2. Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02118
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  • Ronald J. Killiany,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02118
    2. Center for Biomedical Imaging, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02118
    3. Department of Environmental Health, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts 02118
    • Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Boston University School of Medicine, 700 Albany Street, W701, Boston, MA 02118
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    • Fax: 617-638-4922

  • The Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative

    1. Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington, Vermont 05405-0068
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  • Data used in the preparation of this article were obtained from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) database (www.loni.ucla.edu\ADNI). As such, the investigators within the ADNI contributed to the design and implementation of ADNI and/or provided data but did not participate in analysis or writing of this report. ADNI investigators include (complete listing available at www.loni.ucla.edu\ADNI\Collaboration\ ADNI_Authorship_list.pdf).

Abstract

Atrophy within the hippocampus (HP) as measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a promising biomarker for the progression to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Subregions of the HP along the longitudinal axis have been found to demonstrate unique function, as well as undergo differential changes in the progression to AD. Little is known of relationships between such HP subregions and other potential biomarkers, such as neuropsychological (NP), genetic, and cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) beta amyloid and tau measures. The purpose of this study was to subdivide the hippocampus to determine how the head, body, and tail were affected in normal control, mild cognitively impaired, and AD subjects, and investigate relationships with HP subregions and other potential biomarkers. MRI scans of 120 participants of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative were processed using FreeSurfer, and the HP was subdivided using 3D Slicer. Each subregion was compared among groups, and correlations were used to determine relationships with NP, genetic, and CSF measures. Results suggest that HP subregions are undergoing differential atrophy in AD, and demonstrate unique relationships with NP and CSF data. Discriminant function analyses revealed that these regions, when combined with NP and CSF measures, were able to classify by diagnostic group, and classify MCI subjects who would and would not progress to AD within 12 months. Anat Rec, 2012. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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