A Case of Brachymetatarsia From Medieval Sardinia (Italy)

Authors

  • Valentina Giuffra,

    Corresponding author
    1. Division of Paleopathology, Department of Translational Research on New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy
    • Correspondence to: Giuffra Valentina, PhD, Division of Paleopathology, Department of Translational Research on New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery, University of Pisa, Via Roma 57, 56126 Pisa, Italy. Fax: 0039 050 992706. E-mail: v.giuffra@med.unipi.it

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  • Raffaella Bianucci,

    1. Division of Paleopathology, Department of Translational Research on New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy
    2. Department of Public Health and Pediatric Sciences, Laboratory of Physical Anthropology, University of Turin, Turin, Italy
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  • Marco Milanese,

    1. Department of History, University of Sassari, Sassari, Italy
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  • Eugenia Tognotti,

    1. Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Sassari, Sassari, Italy
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  • Andrea Montella,

    1. Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Sassari, Sassari, Italy
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  • Davide Caramella,

    1. Division of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Department of Translational Research on New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy
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  • Gino Fornaciari,

    1. Division of Paleopathology, Department of Translational Research on New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy
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  • Pasquale Bandiera

    1. Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Sassari, Sassari, Italy
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Errata

This article is corrected by:

  1. Errata: Corrigendum Volume 298, Issue 3, 638, Article first published online: 17 February 2015

  • This article was published online on 30 January 2014. An error was subsequently identified. This notice is included in the online versions to indicate that online version have been corrected 14 August 2014.

ABSTRACT

Archaeological excavations carried out in the Medieval village of Geridu (Sardinia) uncovered several burials dating to the late 13th or the first half of 14th century. Among these individuals, the skeleton of an adult female showing a bilateral abnormal shortness of the fourth metatarsal bone was identified. Bilaterality and absence of other skeletal anomalies allow to rule out an acquired aetiology of the disease and to support a diagnosis of congenital brachymetatarsia. Such a rare deformity has a clinical incidence of 0.02% to 0.05%, with strong predominance of the female gender. To our knowledge, no other cases of brachymetatarsia have been reported in paleopathology so far. Anat Rec, 297:650–652, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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