Interactive and dynamic visualizations in teaching and learning of anatomy: A cognitive load perspective

Authors

  • Mohammed K. Khalil,

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    • Learning Systems Institute, Florida State University, 2000 Levy Avenue, Suite 320, Tallahassee, FL 32310
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    • Dr. Khalil is an assistant in research at the Learning Systems Institute (LSI) at Florida State University (FSU). He taught gross anatomy for several years and currently his research interests are in the areas of learning and instructional technology. He is interested in advancing medical education with innovative strategies and technologies. Dr. Paas is an associate professor of educational technology at Educational Technology Expertise Centre, Open University, The Netherlands. He has developed research expertise in cognition and instruction, instructional design for complex learning, cognitive load, measurement, adaptive education, and multimedia instruction. Dr. Johnson is the associate director for research at the LSI at FSU. He has designed, developed, researched, and evaluated many computer-based prototypes and programs related to science, engineering, and medicine. He is currently working on several research projects studying human expertise. Dr. Payer is the director for the anatomy, embryology, and imaging course and the director of the year 1 medical curriculum at the FSU College of Medicine. His primary interests are in developing continuous quality improvement, enhancing student learning, and increasing student satisfaction while also reducing operational costs. Dr. Payer is a member of the AAA Educational Affairs Committee

  • Fred Paas,

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    • Dr. Khalil is an assistant in research at the Learning Systems Institute (LSI) at Florida State University (FSU). He taught gross anatomy for several years and currently his research interests are in the areas of learning and instructional technology. He is interested in advancing medical education with innovative strategies and technologies. Dr. Paas is an associate professor of educational technology at Educational Technology Expertise Centre, Open University, The Netherlands. He has developed research expertise in cognition and instruction, instructional design for complex learning, cognitive load, measurement, adaptive education, and multimedia instruction. Dr. Johnson is the associate director for research at the LSI at FSU. He has designed, developed, researched, and evaluated many computer-based prototypes and programs related to science, engineering, and medicine. He is currently working on several research projects studying human expertise. Dr. Payer is the director for the anatomy, embryology, and imaging course and the director of the year 1 medical curriculum at the FSU College of Medicine. His primary interests are in developing continuous quality improvement, enhancing student learning, and increasing student satisfaction while also reducing operational costs. Dr. Payer is a member of the AAA Educational Affairs Committee

  • Tristan E. Johnson,

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    • Dr. Khalil is an assistant in research at the Learning Systems Institute (LSI) at Florida State University (FSU). He taught gross anatomy for several years and currently his research interests are in the areas of learning and instructional technology. He is interested in advancing medical education with innovative strategies and technologies. Dr. Paas is an associate professor of educational technology at Educational Technology Expertise Centre, Open University, The Netherlands. He has developed research expertise in cognition and instruction, instructional design for complex learning, cognitive load, measurement, adaptive education, and multimedia instruction. Dr. Johnson is the associate director for research at the LSI at FSU. He has designed, developed, researched, and evaluated many computer-based prototypes and programs related to science, engineering, and medicine. He is currently working on several research projects studying human expertise. Dr. Payer is the director for the anatomy, embryology, and imaging course and the director of the year 1 medical curriculum at the FSU College of Medicine. His primary interests are in developing continuous quality improvement, enhancing student learning, and increasing student satisfaction while also reducing operational costs. Dr. Payer is a member of the AAA Educational Affairs Committee

  • Andrew F. Payer

    Search for more papers by this author
    • Dr. Khalil is an assistant in research at the Learning Systems Institute (LSI) at Florida State University (FSU). He taught gross anatomy for several years and currently his research interests are in the areas of learning and instructional technology. He is interested in advancing medical education with innovative strategies and technologies. Dr. Paas is an associate professor of educational technology at Educational Technology Expertise Centre, Open University, The Netherlands. He has developed research expertise in cognition and instruction, instructional design for complex learning, cognitive load, measurement, adaptive education, and multimedia instruction. Dr. Johnson is the associate director for research at the LSI at FSU. He has designed, developed, researched, and evaluated many computer-based prototypes and programs related to science, engineering, and medicine. He is currently working on several research projects studying human expertise. Dr. Payer is the director for the anatomy, embryology, and imaging course and the director of the year 1 medical curriculum at the FSU College of Medicine. His primary interests are in developing continuous quality improvement, enhancing student learning, and increasing student satisfaction while also reducing operational costs. Dr. Payer is a member of the AAA Educational Affairs Committee


Abstract

With the increasing use of computers in the classroom and the advancement of information technology, a requirement to investigate and evaluate different strategies for the presentation of verbal information in interactive and dynamic visualizations has risen to a high level of importance. There is a need for research efforts that apply cognitive load theory (CLT), cognitive learning strategies, and established principles of multimedia design to conduct empirical research that will add to our knowledge of designing and developing dynamic visualizations for teaching and learning anatomy. The impact of improved teaching and learning of anatomical sciences and the development of a set of guiding principles to facilitate the design and development of effective dynamic visualizations represent a significant achievement for medical education with wide application. This theoretical paper presents the foundations of CLT, cognitive learning strategies, and principles of multimedia design to guide the needed research on dynamic visualizations. Anat Rec (Part B: New Anat) 286B:8–14, 2005. © 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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