Epidemiologic studies on systemic lupus erythematosus comparative data for new york city and jefferson county, alabama, 1956–1965

Authors

  • Morris Siegel Md MPh,

    Corresponding author
    1. Professor, Environmental Medicine and Community Health, State University of New York College of Medicine, Down state Medical Center, 450 Clarkson Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11203
    2. Department of Environmental Medicine and Community Health, State University of New York, Downstate Medical Center; Division of Rheumatology, The University of Alabama in Birmingham Medical Center, and Division of Hematology, Maimonides Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY.
    • Department of Environmental Medicine and Community Health, State University of New York, Downstate Medical Center; Division of Rheumatology, The University of Alabama in Birmingham Medical Center, and Division of Hematology, Maimonides Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY
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  • Howard L. Holley MD,

    1. Professor and Director, Division of Clinical Immunology and Rheumatology of University of Alabama, Birmingham Medical Center
    2. Department of Environmental Medicine and Community Health, State University of New York, Downstate Medical Center; Division of Rheumatology, The University of Alabama in Birmingham Medical Center, and Division of Hematology, Maimonides Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY.
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  • Stanley L. Lee MD

    1. Associate Professor of Medicine, State University of New York, Downstate Medical Center; and Director, Division of Hematology, Maimonides Medical Center.
    2. Department of Environmental Medicine and Community Health, State University of New York, Downstate Medical Center; Division of Rheumatology, The University of Alabama in Birmingham Medical Center, and Division of Hematology, Maimonides Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY.
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Abstract

A comparative population study on SLE from 1956–1965 revealed higher attack rates in New York City than in Jefferson County, Ala. The difference was attributed to more complete case-finding in New York rather than to regional differences in predisposing factors. In both localities, incidence, prevalence and mortality rates were approximately three times higher for Negro females than for whites. In males, however, few cases were observed, and ethnic differences were considered equivocal.

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