Renal histology and clinical course of systemic lupus erythematosus

Authors

  • Dr. Don E. Cheatum MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Fellow in Internal Medicine (Trainee in Arthritis), The University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, Dallas, Texas
    2. Departments of Internal Medicine (Rheumatic Diseases Unit) and Pathology, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical School at Dallas, and Dallas V.A. Hospital, Dallas, Texas.
    • Department of Internal Medicine (Rheumatology), Dallas Medical and Surgical Clinic, 4105 Live Oak, Dallas, TX 75221
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  • Eric R. Hurd MD,

    1. Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, Dallas, Texas
    2. Departments of Internal Medicine (Rheumatic Diseases Unit) and Pathology, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical School at Dallas, and Dallas V.A. Hospital, Dallas, Texas.
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  • Stanley W. Strunk MD,

    1. Departments of Internal Medicine (Rheumatic Diseases Unit) and Pathology, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical School at Dallas, and Dallas V.A. Hospital, Dallas, Texas.
    Current affiliation:
    1. Department of Pathology, St. Joseph Hospital, Denver, Colorado
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  • Morris Ziff MD, PhD

    1. Chief, Rheumatic Diseases Unit and Professor of Internal Medicine, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, Dallas, Texas
    2. Departments of Internal Medicine (Rheumatic Diseases Unit) and Pathology, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical School at Dallas, and Dallas V.A. Hospital, Dallas, Texas.
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Abstract

Thirty women with systemic lupus erythematosus were categorized into groups with and without significant renal involvement on the basis of renal biopsy and subsequently followed for an average of 9.4 years. At this time 53% of the patients with renal disease and 70% of the “nonrenal” patients had died. While 80% of the deaths in the “renal” group were due to renal disease, none of the nonrenal patients died of this complication. Major central nervous system involvement was eventually noted in 100% of the nonrenal group. After 8.3 years, mortality in the nonrenal patients exceeded that in the renal group, mainly because of the emergence of central nervous system disease.

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