Migrainous phenomena in systemic lupus erythematosus

Authors

  • Kenneth D. Brandt M.D,

    Corresponding author
    1. Professor of Medicine and Head, Rheumatology Division, Indiana University School of Medicine
    2. Rheumatology Division, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana, and the Departments of Ophthalmology, Neurology and Anatomy, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts.
    • Rheumatology Division, Indiana University School of Medicine, 1100 West Michigan Street, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202
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  • Simmons Lessell M.D

    1. Professor of Ophthalmology, Neurology and Anatomy, Boston University School of Medicine.
    2. Rheumatology Division, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana, and the Departments of Ophthalmology, Neurology and Anatomy, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts.
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Abstract

Eleven patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) also had headaches and/or visual hallucinations typical of those found in migraine. These migrainous symptoms were commonly associated with exacerbations of SLE and abated as disease activity subsided. In some cases corticosteroids were more effective than conventional antimigraine therapy in controlling headaches and scotomas. The data suggest that migraine-like phenomena may arise as a result of vascular dysfunction in SLE.

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