Vascular changes in psoriatic synovium. a light and electron microscopic study

Authors

  • Luis R. Espinoza MD,

    Associate Professor of Medicine, Corresponding author
    1. Departments of Internal Medicine and Pathology, Division of Rheumatology, College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33612.
    • Box 19, College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33612
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  • Frank B. Vasey MD,

    Assistant Professor of Medicine
    1. Departments of Internal Medicine and Pathology, Division of Rheumatology, College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33612.
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  • Carmen G. Espinoza MD,

    Assistant Professor of Pathology
    1. Departments of Internal Medicine and Pathology, Division of Rheumatology, College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33612.
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  • Tomas S. Bocanegra MD,

    Fellow in Rheumatology
    1. Departments of Internal Medicine and Pathology, Division of Rheumatology, College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33612.
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  • Bernard F. Germain MD

    Associate Professor Of Medicine And Chief
    1. Departments of Internal Medicine and Pathology, Division of Rheumatology, College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33612.
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Abstract

Light and electron microscopic studies were performed on the synovial membranes from the large joints of 12 patients with psoriatic arthritis. The most significant histopathologic findings were vascular changes that were characterized by endothelial cell swelling accompanied by inflammatory cell infiltration and marked thickening of the vessel wall. Fibrosis of the subsynoviocyte tissue was also prominent, especially in patients with chronic disease. Villi were not prominent, and the lining layer was not thickened. Both type A and B cells were seen; none had significant abnormalities. No electron-dense deposits were observed. These findings lend further support to the theory that microvascular changes play a significant role in the pathogenesis of psoriasis and its related arthritis.

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