Survival in systemic lupus erythematosus. a multivariate analysis of demographic factors

Authors

  • Stephanie Studenski MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Division of Rheumatology&Immunology, Department of Medicine, and the Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina.
    • Box 31082, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710
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  • David S. Caldwell MD,

    1. Division of Rheumatology&Immunology, Department of Medicine, and the Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina.
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  • Nancy B. Allen MD,

    1. Division of Rheumatology&Immunology, Department of Medicine, and the Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina.
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  • John R. Rice MD,

    1. Division of Rheumatology&Immunology, Department of Medicine, and the Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina.
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  • Richard P. Polisson MD

    1. Division of Rheumatology&Immunology, Department of Medicine, and the Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina.
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Abstract

We analyzed survival rate and important clinical outcomes in 411 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus who were seen at our center between 1969 and 1984. All eligible subjects met 4 of the revised American Rheumatism Association criteria for systemic lupus erythematosus and all were seen within 2 years of diagnosis. Mean followup was 75.6 months. Multivariate analysis suggested significant independent effects of race (P = 0.0139) and socioeconomic status (P = 0.0326) on survival. No evidence of diminished lupus-related mortality with age was documented. Previously reported findings of improved survival rate with age may have been confounded by differences in race distribution between the younger- and older-onset groups.

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