Suppression of monosodium urate crystal—induced acute inflammation by diets enriched with gamma-linolenic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid

Authors

  • Guillermo A. Tate MD,

    Research Associate
    1. Rheumatology Section, Department of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania; The Arthritis/Immunology Center, Philadelphia Veterans Administration Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; and the Department of Nutrition, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey.
    Current affiliation:
    1. University of Buenos Aires School of Medicine, Buenos Aires, Argentina
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  • Brian F. Mandell MD, PhD,

    Assistant Professor of Medicine
    1. Rheumatology Section, Department of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania; The Arthritis/Immunology Center, Philadelphia Veterans Administration Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; and the Department of Nutrition, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey.
    Current affiliation:
    1. The Graduate Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
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  • Rashida A. Karmali PhD,

    Professor of Nutrition
    1. Rheumatology Section, Department of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania; The Arthritis/Immunology Center, Philadelphia Veterans Administration Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; and the Department of Nutrition, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey.
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  • Michael Laposata MD, PhD,

    Assistant Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
    1. Rheumatology Section, Department of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania; The Arthritis/Immunology Center, Philadelphia Veterans Administration Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; and the Department of Nutrition, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey.
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  • Daniel G. Baker MD,

    Associate Professor of Medicine
    1. Rheumatology Section, Department of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania; The Arthritis/Immunology Center, Philadelphia Veterans Administration Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; and the Department of Nutrition, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey.
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  • H. Ralph Schumacher Jr MD,

    Professor of Medicine and Director
    1. Rheumatology Section, Department of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania; The Arthritis/Immunology Center, Philadelphia Veterans Administration Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; and the Department of Nutrition, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey.
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  • Robert B. Zurier MD

    Professor of Medicine and Chief of Rheumatology, Corresponding author
    1. Rheumatology Section, Department of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania; The Arthritis/Immunology Center, Philadelphia Veterans Administration Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; and the Department of Nutrition, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey.
    • 570 Maloney Building, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, 3600 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104
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Abstract

A subcutaneous air pouch formed in Sprague-Dawley rats was used to study the effect of diets enriched in γ-linolenic acid (GLA) (in plant seed oil) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) (in fish oil) on acute inflammation induced by monosodium urate crystals. The GLA-enriched diet suppressed significantly the cellular phase of inflammation (polymorphonuclear leukocyte accumulation, crystal phagocytosis, and lysosomal enzyme activity), but it had little effect on the fluid phase (exudate volume and protein concentration). In contrast, the EPA-enriched diet suppressed the fluid phase but not the cellular phase of inflammation. The findings indicate that the fluid and cellular phases of acute inflammation can be controlled independently. A combined diet of fish oil and plant seed oil (EPA-enriched and GLA-enriched) reduced both the cellular and fluid phases of inflammation. Thus, dietary provision of alternative substrates for oxidative metabolism (other than arachidonic acid) modifies monosodium urate crystal-induced acute inflammation.

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