Prognosis in systemic lupus erythematosus

Authors

  • John D. Reveille MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Medicine
    2. Departments of Medicine (Division of Clinical Immunology and Rheumatology and the Clinical Information Systems), Biostatistics and Biomathematics, and Epidemiology, School of Medicine and School of Public Health. The University of Alabama at Birmingham.
    Current affiliation:
    1. Division of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunogenetics, University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston
    • Division of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunogenetics, University of Texas Health Science Center, PO Box 20708, Houston, TX 77225
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  • Alfred Bartolucci PhD,

    1. Department of Biostatistics and Biomathematics
    2. Departments of Medicine (Division of Clinical Immunology and Rheumatology and the Clinical Information Systems), Biostatistics and Biomathematics, and Epidemiology, School of Medicine and School of Public Health. The University of Alabama at Birmingham.
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  • Graciela S. Alarcón Md, Mph

    1. Department of Medicine
    2. Departments of Medicine (Division of Clinical Immunology and Rheumatology and the Clinical Information Systems), Biostatistics and Biomathematics, and Epidemiology, School of Medicine and School of Public Health. The University of Alabama at Birmingham.
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Abstract

To assess the impact of demographic and clinical factors on prognosis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), we examined survivorship by life-table analysis in 389 patients. There were approximately equal numbers of Caucasian patients and American black patients in this study group. On both univariate and multivariate analyses, we found that both American black race and increasing age at SLE onset independently worsened the probability of survival. Of all the clinical factors we analyzed, thrombocytopenia emerged as the only independent risk factor for a worse prognosis in SLE. In all clinical and demographic groups considered, the leading cause of death was infection.

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