Signal measurement strategies: are they feasible and do they offer any advantage in outcome measurement in osteoarthritis?

Authors

  • Nicholas Bellamy MD, MSc,FRCP(Edin, Glas and C), FACP,

    Corresponding author
    1. Associate Professor of Medicine, Epidemiology, and Biostatistics, University of Western Ontario
    2. Department of Medicine, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, and the Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
    • Suite 402A, Victoria Hospital, Westminster Tower, 800 Commissioners Road East, London, Ontario N6A 4G5, Canada
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  • W. Watson Buchanan MD, FRCP(Edin, Glas and C),

    1. Professor of Medicine, McMaster University
    2. Department of Medicine, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, and the Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
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  • Charles H. Goldsmith PhD,

    1. Professor of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University
    2. Department of Medicine, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, and the Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
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  • Jane Campbell BA,

    1. Research Assistant, University of Western Ontario
    2. Department of Medicine, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, and the Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
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  • Eric Duku BSc, Grad Dip, MSc

    1. Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University
    2. Department of Medicine, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, and the Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
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Abstract

The applicability of a signal measurement strategy was compared with a traditional method of measuring outcome in osteoarthritis. The signal method detected statistically significant alterations in health status with small sample sizes and with a relative efficiency close to or at unity. The prevalence of deterioration in nonsignal items was low. Signal methods of measurement may provide an alternative approach to outcome measurement in osteoarthritis clinical trials.

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