Cost-effectiveness of increased telephone contact for patients with osteoarthritis: A randomized, controlled trial

Authors

  • Morris Weinberger PhD,

    Associate Director, Corresponding author
    1. Center for Health Services Research in Primary Care, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina
    2. Associate Professor of Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine, Duke University Medical Center
    • Center for Health Services Research in Primary Care, Veterans Affairs Medical Center (152), 508 Fulton Street, Durham, NC 27705
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  • William M. Tierney MD,

    Professor Of Medicine
    1. Division of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine
    2. Associate Director, Computer Science Research Group, Regenstrief Institute for Health Care, Indianapolis, Indiana
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  • Patricia A. Cowper PhD,

    Health Science Officer
    1. Center for Health Services Research in Primary Care, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina
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  • Barry P. Katz PhD,

    Associate Professor of Medicine
    1. Division of Biostatistics, Department of Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, and Biostatistician, Regenstrief Institute for Health Care, Indianapolis, Indiana
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  • Patricia A. Booher BA

    Research Associate
    1. Regenstrief Institute for Health Care, Indianapolis, Indiana
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Abstract

Objective. To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of telephone intervention for patients with osteoarthritis.

Methods. Randomized, controlled trial.

Results. The intervention did not significantly increase health care costs. The annual costs for a 1-unit improvement in physical functioning and in pain, as measured by the Arthritis Impact Measurement Scales, were $70.86 and $31.00, respectively.

Conclusion. Telephone contact is a potentially cost-effective intervention in osteoarthritis.

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