Dietary and allergic associations with rheumatoid arthritis: Self-report of 704 patients

Authors

  • S. Bobo Tanner,

    1. Division of Rheumatology and Immunology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee
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  • Leigh F. Callahan,

    1. Division of Rheumatology and Immunology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee
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  • Richard Panush,

    1. Department of Medicine, Saint Barnabas Medical Center, UMDNJ—New Jersey Medical School, Livingston, New Jersey
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  • Theodore Pincus MD

    Corresponding author
    1. Division of Rheumatology and Immunology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee
    • Division of Rheumatology and Immunology, Depatment of Medicine, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, T-3219 Medical Center North, Nashville, TN 37232
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Abstract

A survey of 704 rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients was performed to analyze responses of patients reporting favorable or unfavorable effects of specific foods on clinical status. Overall, 28% of patients reported some association between a specific food and clinical status. Patients reporting food associations tended to report higher levels of allergies and family history of allergies, but did not differ importantly in clinical status or demographic variables from patients reporting no associations of foods and clinical status. These data suggest that a subset of RA patients might have food sensitivity as a component of clinical activity, but most patients find no associations between foods and clinical status.

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