Content comparison of occupation-based instruments in adult rheumatology and musculoskeletal rehabilitation based on the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health

Authors

  • Tanja A. Stamm,

    Corresponding author
    1. Vienna Medical University, Vienna, Austria, ICF Research Branch of the WHO Collaborating Center for the Family of International Classifications at the German Institute of Medical Documentation and Information, Munich, and Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich, Germany
    • Vienna Medical University, Department of Internal Medicine III, Divsion of Rheumatology, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, A–1090 Vienna, Austria===

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  • Alarcos Cieza,

    1. ICF Research Branch of the WHO Collaborating Center for the Family of International Classifications at the German Institute of Medical Documentation and Information, Munich, Germany
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  • Klaus P. Machold,

    1. Vienna Medical University, Vienna, Austria
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  • Josef S. Smolen,

    1. Vienna Medical University, Vienna, Austria
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  • Gerold Stucki

    1. ICF Research Branch of the WHO Collaborating Center for the Family of International Classifi-cations at the German Institute of Medical Documentation and Information and Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich, Germany
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Abstract

Objective

To compare the content of clinical, occupation-based instruments that are used in adult rheumatology and musculoskeletal rehabilitation in occupational therapy based on the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF).

Methods

Clinical instruments of occupational performance and occupation in adult rehabilitation and rheumatology were identified in a literature search. All items of these instruments were linked to the ICF categories according to 10 linking rules. On the basis of the linking, the content of these instruments was compared and the relationship between the capacity and performance component explored.

Results

The following 7 instruments were identified: the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure, the Assessment of Motor and Process Skills, the Sequential Occupational Dexterity Assessment, the Jebson Taylor Hand Function Test, the Moberg Picking Up Test, the Button Test, and the Functional Dexterity Test. The items of the 7 instruments were linked to 53 different ICF categories. Five items could not be linked to the ICF. The areas covered by the 7 occupation-based instruments differ importantly: The main focus of all 7 instruments is on the ICF component activities and participation. Body functions are covered by 2 instruments. Two instruments were linked to 1 single ICF category only.

Conclusion

Clinicians and researchers who need to select an occupation-based instrument must be aware of the areas that are covered by this instrument and the potential areas that are not covered at all.

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