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Keywords:

  • Self-efficacy;
  • Routine multidisciplinary rehabilitation;
  • Hip joint replacement;
  • Disability;
  • Pain;
  • Depressive symptoms

Abstract

Objective

To examine whether a routine multidisciplinary inpatient rehabilitation program can increase patient self-efficacy, and to investigate the effects of high self-efficacy at admission, and increases in self-efficacy, on health changes in patients who undergo such rehabilitation after hip joint replacement.

Methods

Participants in this longitudinal study were 1,065 patients who underwent inpatient rehabilitation after hip joint replacement. Questionnaires were administered at admission, discharge, and 6-month followup. The main outcome variables were disability, pain, depressive symptomatology, and self-efficacy to cope with disability and pain.

Results

Significant improvements from admission to discharge from the inpatient rehabilitation program in disability, pain, depressive symptoms, and self-efficacy were found. In addition, higher levels of self-efficacy at admission and larger increases in self-efficacy over the course of the program predicted larger health changes (i.e., greater decreases in disability, pain, and depressive symptoms). Results were generally similar for health changes from discharge to 6-month followup.

Conclusion

A routine multidisciplinary inpatient rehabilitation program after hip joint replacement can result in enhanced self-efficacy.