Distinct regulation of interleukin-17 in human T helper lymphocytes

Authors

  • Zhi Chen,

    Corresponding author
    1. National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases and National Human Genome Research Institute, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland
    Current affiliation:
    1. DNAX Discovery Research, Schering-Plough Biopharma, Palo Alto, California
    • Building 10, Room 9N262, 10 Center Drive, MSC-1820, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892-1820
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  • Cristina M. Tato,

    1. National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases and National Human Genome Research Institute, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland
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  • Linda Muul,

    1. National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases and National Human Genome Research Institute, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland
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  • Arian Laurence,

    1. National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases and National Human Genome Research Institute, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland
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  • John J. O'Shea

    1. National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases and National Human Genome Research Institute, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland
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Abstract

Objective

Interleukin-17 (IL-17)–producing T helper cells have been proposed to represent a separate lineage of CD4+ cells, designated Th17 cells, which are regulated by the transcription factor retinoic acid–related orphan receptor γt (RORγt). However, despite advances in understanding murine Th17 differentiation, a systematic assessment of factors that promote the differentiation of naive human T cells to Th17 cells has not been reported. The present study was undertaken to assess the effects on naive human CD4+ T cells of cytokines known to promote murine Th17 cells.

Methods

Human naive and memory CD4+ T cells isolated from peripheral blood were activated and cultured with various cytokines. Cytokine production was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and flow cytometry. Messenger RNA was measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction.

Results

In response to anti-CD3/anti-CD28 stimulation alone, human memory T cells rapidly produced IL-17, whereas naive T cells expressed low levels. Transforming growth factor β1 and IL-6 up-regulated RORγt expression but did not induce Th17 differentiation of naive CD4+ T cells. However, IL-23 up-regulated its own receptor and was an important inducer of IL-17 and IL-22.

Conclusion

The present data demonstrate the differential regulation of IL-17 and RORγt expression in human CD4+ T cells compared with murine cells. Optimal conditions for the development of IL-17–producing T cells from murine naive precursors are ineffective in human T cells. Conversely, IL-23 promoted the generation of human Th17 cells but was also a very potent inducer of other proinflammatory cytokines. These findings may have important implications in the pathogenesis of human autoimmunity as compared with mouse models.

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