Effect of certolizumab pegol with methotrexate on home and work place productivity and social activities in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis

Authors

  • Arthur Kavanaugh,

    Corresponding author
    1. University of California, San Diego
    • Center for Innovative Therapy, UCSD, Division of Rheumatology, Allergy and Immunology, 9500 Gilman Drive, Mail Code 0943, La Jolla, CA 92093-0943
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    • Dr. Kavanaugh has conducted research sponsored by UCB and has received consulting fees (less than $10,000) from UCB.

  • Josef S. Smolen,

    1. Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria
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    • Dr. Smolen has received grant support and honoraria (less than $10,000) from UCB.

  • Paul Emery,

    1. University of Leeds, Leeds, UK
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    • Drs. Emery and van Vollenhoven have received consulting fees, speaking fees, and honoraria (less than $10,000 each) from UCB.

  • Oana Purcaru,

    1. UCB, Braine-l'Alleud, Belgium
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    • Dr. Purcaru is a full-time employee of UCB.

  • Edward Keystone,

    1. Mount Sinai Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
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    • Dr. Keystone has received research funding, consulting fees, speaking fees, and/or honoraria (less than $10,000 each) from UCB, Abbot, Amgen, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Centocor, F. Hoffmann-La Roche, Genentech, GlaxoSmithKline, Schering-Plough, and Wyeth.

  • Lance Richard,

    1. UCB, Slough, UK
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    • Dr. Richard is a former full-time employee of UCB.

  • Vibeke Strand,

    1. Stanford University, Palo Alto, California
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    • Dr. Strand has received consulting fees (less than $10,000) from and serves on the advisory board for UCB, and has received consulting fees, speaking fees, and/or honoraria (less than $10,000 each) from Abbott Immunology, Alder, Allergan, Almirall, Amgen, AstraZeneca, Bexel, Biogen Idec, CanFite, Centocor, Chelsea, Crescendo, Cypress Biosciences, Euro-Diagnostica, Fibrogen, Forest Laboratories, Genentech, Human Genome Science, Idera, Incyte, Jazz Pharmaceuticals, Lexicon Genetics, Logical Therapeutics, Lux Biosciences, MedImmune, Merck Serono, Novartis Pharmaceuticals, Novo Nordisk, Nuon, Ono Pharmaceuticals, Pfizer, Procter and Gamble, Rigel, Roche, Sanofi-Aventis, Savient, Schering-Plough, SKK, and Wyeth.

  • Ronald F. van Vollenhoven

    1. Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden
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    • Drs. Emery and van Vollenhoven have received consulting fees, speaking fees, and honoraria (less than $10,000 each) from UCB.


  • ClinicalTrials.gov identifiers: RAPID 1, NCT00152386; RAPID 2, NCT00160602.

Abstract

Objective

To assess the impact of certolizumab pegol (CZP), a novel PEGylated anti–tumor necrosis factor, in combination with methotrexate (MTX) on productivity outside and within the home, and on participation in family, social, and leisure activities in adult patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA).

Methods

The efficacy and safety of CZP (200 mg and 400 mg) plus MTX were assessed in 2 phase III, multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials (Rheumatoid Arthritis Prevention of Structural Damage [RAPID] 1 and RAPID 2). The novel, validated, RA-specific Work Productivity Survey (WPS-RA) was used to assess work place and home productivity. WPS-RA responses were collected at baseline and every 4 weeks until withdrawal/study completion.

Results

At baseline, 41.6% and 39.8% of subjects were employed outside the home in RAPID 1 and RAPID 2, respectively. Compared with placebo plus MTX, CZP plus MTX significantly reduced work absenteeism and presenteeism among patients working outside the home. Significant reductions in number of household days lost, household days with productivity reduced by ≥50%, and days lost due to RA for participation in family, social, and leisure activities were reported by patients in active treatment relative to placebo plus MTX. Improvements in all measures were observed with CZP plus MTX as early as week 4, and maintained until the study end (12 months in RAPID 1, 6 months in RAPID 2). Findings were consistent with clinical improvements with CZP plus MTX in both trials.

Conclusion

CZP plus MTX improved productivity outside and within the home and resulted in more participation in social activities compared with placebo plus MTX. These observations suggest that considerable indirect cost gains might be achieved with this therapeutic agent in RA.

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