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The translucent cadaver: A follow-up study to gauge the efficacy of implementing changes suggested by students

Authors

  • Sanet Henriët Kotzé,

    Corresponding author
    1. Division of Anatomy and Histology, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Stellenbosch, Tygerberg, South Africa
    • Correspondence to: Dr. Sanet Henriët Kotzé, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Stellenbosch, P.O. Box 19063, Tygerberg 7505, South Africa. E-mail: shk@sun.ac.za

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  • Natasha Darné Driescher,

    1. Division of Anatomy and Histology, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Stellenbosch, Tygerberg, South Africa
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  • Calvin Gerald Mole

    1. Division of Anatomy and Histology, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Stellenbosch, Tygerberg, South Africa
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Abstract

In a study conducted in 2011, the use of full body digital X-ray images (Lodox® Statscan®) and drawings were described for surface anatomy education during which suggestions were made by students on how to improve the method. Educational innovations should continuously be adjusted and improved to provide the best possible scenario for student learning. This study, therefore, reports on the efficacy of implementing some of these suggestions. Suggestions incorporated into the follow-up study included: (1) The inclusion of eight strategically placed labeled digital X-ray images to the dissection halls, (2) The placement of both labeled and unlabeled digital X-ray images online, (3) The inclusion of informal oral questions on surface anatomy during dissection, (4) The requirement of students to submit individual drawings in addition to group drawings into their portfolios, and (5) Integrating information on how to recognize anatomical structures on X-rays into gross anatomy lectures given prior to dissection. Students were requested to complete an anonymous questionnaire. The results of the drawings, tests and questionnaires were compared to the results from the 2011 cohort. During 2012, an increased usage of the digital X-rays and an increase in practical test marks in three out of the four modules (statistically significant only in the cardiovascular module) were reported. More students from the 2012 cohort believed the images enhanced their experience of learning surface anatomy and that its use should be continued in future. The suggested changes, therefore, had a positive effect on surface anatomy education. Anat Sci Educ 6: 433–439. © 2013 American Association of Anatomists.

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