Get access

Determination of clinically relevant content for a musculoskeletal anatomy curriculum for physical medicine and rehabilitation residents

Authors

  • Kristina Lisk,

    Corresponding author
    1. Graduate Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    • Correspondence to: Ms. Kristina Lisk, Graduate Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, 1 King's College Circle, Medical Sciences Building, Room 1158, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 1A8 Canada. E-mail: lisk.kristina@gmail.com

    Search for more papers by this author
  • John F. Flannery,

    1. Division of Physiatry, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Eldon Y. Loh,

    1. Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Denyse Richardson,

    1. Division of Physiatry, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Anne M.R. Agur,

    1. Graduate Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    2. Division of Physiatry, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    3. Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Nicole N. Woods

    1. Graduate Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    2. Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

To address the need for more clinical anatomy training in residency education, many postgraduate programs have implemented structured anatomy courses into their curriculum. Consensus often does not exist on specific content and level of detail of the content that should be included in such curricula. This article describes the use of the Delphi method to identify clinically relevant content to incorporate in a musculoskeletal anatomy curriculum for Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (PM&R) residents. A two round modified Delphi involving PM&R experts was used to establish the curricular content. The anatomical structures and clinical conditions presented to the expert group were compiled using multiple sources: clinical musculoskeletal anatomy cases from the PM&R residency program at the University of Toronto; consultation with PM&R experts; and textbooks. In each round, experts rated the importance of each curricular item to PM&R residency education using a five-point Likert scale. Internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha) was used to determine consensus at the end of each round and agreement scores were used as an outcome measure to determine the content to include in the curriculum. The overall internal consistency in both rounds was 0.99. A total of 37 physiatrists from across Canada participated and the overall response rate over two rounds was 97%. The initial curricular list consisted of 361 items. After the second iteration, the list was reduced by 44%. By using a national consensus method we were able to objectively determine the relevant anatomical structures and clinical musculoskeletal conditions important in daily PM&R practice. Anat Sci Educ 7: 135–143. © 2013 American Association of Anatomists.

Ancillary