Fostering interprofessional teamwork in an academic medical center: Near-peer education for students during gross medical anatomy

Authors

  • Richard K. Shields,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science, Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa
    • Correspondence to: Dr. Richard K. Shields, Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science, Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine, The University of Iowa, 1-252 Medical Education Building, Iowa City, IA 52242-1190, USA. E-mail: richard-shields@uiowa.edu

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  • Marc A. Pizzimenti,

    1. Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa
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  • Shauna Dudley-Javoroski,

    1. Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science, Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa
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  • Debra A. Schwinn

    1. Department of Anesthesia, Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa
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Abstract

The purpose of this report is to describe student satisfaction with a near-peer interprofessional education (IPE) session for physical therapy and medical students. Ten senior physical therapy students worked in peer-groups to develop a musculoskeletal anatomy demonstration for first-semester medical students. Together with their classmates, they demonstrated observation, palpation, and musculoskeletal assessment of the shoulder and scapular-thoracic articulation to medical student dissection groups in the Gross Anatomy laboratory. The medical students were encouraged to consider the synergistic function of shoulder structures and the potential impact of a selected pathology: rotator cuff injury. The session provided the medical students with an opportunity to integrate their new anatomical knowledge into a framework for clinical musculoskeletal evaluation. The experience offered senior physical therapy students an opportunity to work in teams with their peers, internalize and adapt to constructive feedback, and seek common ground with members of another profession. Both student groups reported a high degree of satisfaction with the sessions and expressed a desire for further interaction. These positive perceptions by student stakeholders have prompted us to consider additional IPE exchanges for the anatomy course in the upcoming school year. Given the positive outcome of this descriptive study, we now plan to systematically test whether near-peer IPE interactions can enhance the degree that students learn key anatomical concepts. Anat Sci Educ 8: 331–337. © 2014 American Association of Anatomists.

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