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Living AnatoME: Teaching and learning musculoskeletal anatomy through yoga and Pilates

Authors

  • Carrie McCulloch,

    Corresponding author
    1. Center for Anatomy and Functional Morphology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York
    2. Kinected, Pilates Center, New York, New York
    • Center for Anatomy and Functional Morphology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, One Gustave L. Levy Place, Box 1007, New York, NY 10029-6574, USA
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  • Stephanie Pieczenik Marango,

    1. Center for Anatomy and Functional Morphology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York
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  • Erica S. Friedman,

    1. Department of Medical Education, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York
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  • Jeffrey T. Laitman

    1. Center for Anatomy and Functional Morphology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York
    2. Department of Medical Education, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York
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Abstract

Living AnatoME, a program designed in 2004 by two medical students in conjunction with the Director of Anatomy, teaches musculoskeletal anatomy through yoga and Pilates. Previously offered as an adjunct to the Gross Anatomy course in 2007, Living AnatoME became an official part of the curriculum. Previous research conducted on the program demonstrated its efficacy in providing relaxation and well-being to students who attended. In 2007, with all 144 gross anatomy students required to participate in a 1.5 hour Living AnatoME session on the upper and lower limbs, the impact of the program on students' comprehension of musculoskeletal anatomy was analyzed through the administration of 25-question pre- and post-tests, gauging knowledge in the following domains: upper limb, lower limb, muscle function, palpation, attachment/location, clinical correlate, and control (i.e., material not emphasized during the intervention). Analysis of postintervention tests revealed significant improvement in total Living AnatoME scores as well as in the domains of upper limb, muscle function, and palpation, indicating the possible efficacy of Living AnatoME in teaching anatomy. Performance on control questions also improved, although not significantly, which may indicate the role of other variables (e.g., additional study time) in increased performance. Anat Sci Educ. © 2010 American Association of Anatomists.

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