The anatomy of self-defense

Authors

  • Pamela Sparks Stein,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Chandler Medical Center, Lexington, Kentucky
    • MN 210 Chandler Medical Center, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, KY 40536, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • April D. Richardson,

    1. Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Chandler Medical Center, Lexington, Kentucky
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Sandra D. Challman

    1. Instructional Technology Center, University of Kentucky College of Dentistry, Chandler Medical Center, Lexington, Kentucky
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

The following study describes a creative application of anatomical principles in the instruction of self-defense. Undergraduates at the University of Kentucky were invited to a special lecture that featured a series of self-defense moves introduced by a local police officer. Following a demonstration of each self-defense tactic, the students were briefed on the anatomy of both the victim and the assailant that contributed to the overall effectiveness of each move. This approach was unique in that students learned critical knowledge of self-defense while reinforcing anatomical principles previously introduced in class. Moreover, this integration of topics prompted students to think about their response to potentially dangerous situations on campus. Anat Sci Ed 1:130–132, 2008. © 2008 American Association of Anatomists.

Ancillary