Evaluation of small-group teaching in human gross anatomy in a Caribbean medical school

Authors

  • Lap Ki Chan,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Anatomy, St. Matthew's University, Grand Cayman, Cayman Islands
    • Institute of Medical and Health Sciences Education, Department of Anatomy, The University of Hong Kong, Faculty Office, 2/F, William MW Mong Block, 21 Sassoon Road, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR, China
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  • Pallab K. Ganguly

    1. Department of Anatomy, St. Matthew's University, Grand Cayman, Cayman Islands
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Abstract

Although there are a number of medical schools in the Caribbean islands, very few reports have come out so far in the literature regarding the efficacy of small-group teaching in them. The introduction of small-group teaching in the gross anatomy laboratory one and a half years ago at St. Matthew's University (SMU) on Grand Cayman appears to have had a significant positive impact on the academic achievement of students in anatomy. This study surveyed the responses of the students to the small-group learning method in gross anatomy at SMU using a structured questionnaire. The results show that our students prefer this small-group learning method over a completely self-directed method in the gross anatomy lab because the study materials were carefully chosen and the study objectives were demonstrated by the resource person. However, teacher-centered teaching was deliberately avoided by fostering problem-solving skills in the anatomy lab sessions. Another aim of the small-group teaching at SMU was to develop the interpersonal and communication skills of the students, which are important in their later education and career. Anat Sci Ed 1:19–22, 2008. © 2007 American Association of Anatomists.

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