Volatile Organic Compound Sensing by Quartz Crystal Microbalances Coated with Nanostructured Macromolecular Metal Complexes

Authors

  • M. Kimura Prof. Dr.,

    1. Department of Functional Polymer Science, Faculty of Textile Science and Technology, Shinshu University, Ueda 386-8567 (Japan), Fax: (+81) 268-21-5499
    2. Collaborative Innovation Center of Nanotech FIBER (nanoFIC), Shinshu University, Ueda 386-8567 (Japan)
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  • M. Sugawara,

    1. Department of Functional Polymer Science, Faculty of Textile Science and Technology, Shinshu University, Ueda 386-8567 (Japan), Fax: (+81) 268-21-5499
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  • S. Sato,

    1. Department of Functional Polymer Science, Faculty of Textile Science and Technology, Shinshu University, Ueda 386-8567 (Japan), Fax: (+81) 268-21-5499
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  • T. Fukawa,

    1. Department of Functional Polymer Science, Faculty of Textile Science and Technology, Shinshu University, Ueda 386-8567 (Japan), Fax: (+81) 268-21-5499
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  • T. Mihara Dr.

    1. Future Creation Laboratory, Olympus Corporation, Tokyo 192-8512 (Japan)
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Abstract

We report the construction of a molecular recognition layer composed of polyelectrolyte brushes and metal complexes on the surface of a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and the sensing abilities for various volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Atom-transfer radical polymerization of 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl acrylate from an initiator-terminated self-assembled monolayer yielded polyelectrolyte brushes on the surface of a weight-detectable quartz crystal microbalance. One end of a poly[(2-dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate] brush was covalently attached onto the surface of a sensor. We found that metallophthalocyanines with four bulky pentaphenylbenzene substituents could adsorb volatile organic compounds selectively into their cavities. Macromolecular metal complexes were prepared by immersing polymer-brush-modified QCMs into an aqueous solution of sterically protected cobalt phthalocyanine. Anionic cobalt phthalocyanine was trapped in the polymer brushes and acted as a molecular receptor for the sensing of VOC molecules.

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