The Legacy of Fossil Fuels

Authors

  • Dr. Nicola Armaroli,

    Corresponding author
    1. Molecular Photoscience Group, Istituto per la Sintesi Organica e la Fotoreattività, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche via Gobetti 101, 40129 Bologna (Italy), Fax: (+39) 051-639-9844
    • Nicola Armaroli, Molecular Photoscience Group, Istituto per la Sintesi Organica e la Fotoreattività, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche via Gobetti 101, 40129 Bologna (Italy), Fax: (+39) 051-639-9844

      Vincenzo Balzani, Dipartimento di Chimica “G. Ciamician”, Università di Bologna, Via Selmi 2, 40126 Bologna (Italy), Fax: (+39) 051-2099543

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  • Prof. Dr. Vincenzo Balzani

    Corresponding author
    1. Dipartimento di Chimica “G. Ciamician”, Università di Bologna, Via Selmi 2, 40126 Bologna (Italy), Fax: (+39) 051-2099543
    • Nicola Armaroli, Molecular Photoscience Group, Istituto per la Sintesi Organica e la Fotoreattività, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche via Gobetti 101, 40129 Bologna (Italy), Fax: (+39) 051-639-9844

      Vincenzo Balzani, Dipartimento di Chimica “G. Ciamician”, Università di Bologna, Via Selmi 2, 40126 Bologna (Italy), Fax: (+39) 051-2099543

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  • This article is an adapted version of a chapter of the book “Energy for a sustainable world. From the oil age to a sun powered future.” Wiley-VCH, 2011.

Abstract

Currently, over 80 % of the energy used by mankind comes from fossil fuels. Harnessing coal, oil and gas, the energy resources contained in the store of our spaceship, Earth, has prompted a dramatic expansion in energy use and a substantial improvement in the quality of life of billions of individuals in some regions of the world. Powering our civilization with fossil fuels has been very convenient, but now we know that it entails severe consequences. We treat fossil fuels as a resource that anyone anywhere can extract and use in any fashion, and Earth’s atmosphere, soil and oceans as a dump for their waste products, including more than 30 Gt/y of carbon dioxide. At present, environmental legacy rather than consistence of exploitable reserves, is the most dramatic problem posed by the relentless increase of fossil fuel global demand. Harmful effects on the environment and human health, usually not incorporated into the pricing of fossil fuels, include immediate and short-term impacts related to their discovery, extraction, transportation, distribution, and burning as well as climate change that are spread over time to future generations or over space to the entire planet. In this essay, several aspects of the fossil fuel legacy are discussed, such as alteration of the carbon cycle, carbon dioxide rise and its measurement, greenhouse effect, anthropogenic climate change, air pollution and human health, geoengineering proposals, land and water degradation, economic problems, indirect effects on the society, and the urgent need of regulatory efforts and related actions to promote a gradual transition out of the fossil fuel era. While manufacturing sustainable solar fuels appears to be a longer-time perspective, alternatives energy sources already exist that have the potential to replace fossil fuels as feedstocks for electricity production.

Abstract

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