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Self-Assembly of Aniline Oligomers

Authors

  • Yanchai Zhao,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemical Engineering, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Weijin Road 92, 300072 Nankai District, Tianjin (P. R. China), Fax: (+86) 27404496
    • Department of Chemical Engineering, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Weijin Road 92, 300072 Nankai District, Tianjin (P. R. China), Fax: (+86) 27404496

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  • Dr. Elena Tomšík,

    1. Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Heyrovsky Sq. 2, 162 06 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)
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  • Prof. Jixiao Wang,

    1. Department of Chemical Engineering, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Weijin Road 92, 300072 Nankai District, Tianjin (P. R. China), Fax: (+86) 27404496
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  • Zuzana Morávková,

    1. Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Heyrovsky Sq. 2, 162 06 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)
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  • Dr. Alexander Zhigunov,

    1. Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Heyrovsky Sq. 2, 162 06 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)
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  • Dr. Jaroslav Stejskal,

    1. Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Heyrovsky Sq. 2, 162 06 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)
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  • Prof. Dr. Miroslava Trchová

    1. Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Heyrovsky Sq. 2, 162 06 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)
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Abstract

A great number of nano/microscaled morphologies have recently been prepared during the oxidation of aniline. At the early stage of oxidation, aniline oligomers are obtained, often in spectacular morphologies depending on reaction conditions. Herein, the flower-like hierarchical architectures assembled from aniline oligomers by a template-free method are reported. Their formation process is ascribed to the self-assembly of oligoanilines through non-covalent interactions, such as hydrogen bonding, hydrophobic forces, and π–π stacking. The model of directional growth is offered to explain the formation of petal-like objects and, subsequently, flowers. In order to investigate the chemical structure of the oligomers, a series of characterizations have been carried out, such as matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization, time-of-flight mass spectrometry, gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry analysis, X-ray diffraction, and UV/Vis, Fourier-transform infrared, and Raman spectroscopies. Based on the results of characterization methods, a formation mechanism for aniline oligomers and their self-assembly is proposed.

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