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Synthesis of Monodisperse Hollow Carbon Nanocapsules by Using Protective Silica Shells

Authors

  • Bo Quan,

    1. Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Republic of Korea), Fax: (+82) 31-8889148
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  • Gi-Eun Nam,

    1. Department of Radiology and the Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 138-736 (Republic of Korea)
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  • Prof. Hyuck Jae Choi,

    1. Department of Radiology and the Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 138-736 (Republic of Korea)
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  • Prof. Yuanzhe Piao

    Corresponding author
    1. Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Republic of Korea), Fax: (+82) 31-8889148
    2. Advanced Institutes of Convergence Technology, Suwon-si 443-270 (Republic of Korea)
    • Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Republic of Korea), Fax: (+82) 31-8889148

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Abstract

Monodisperse hollow carbon nanocapsules (<200 nm) with mesoporous shells were synthesized by coating their outer shells with silica to prevent aggregation during their high-temperature annealing. Monodispersed silica nanoparticles were used as starting materials and octadecyltrimethoxysilane (C18TMS) was used as a carbon source to create core–shell nanostructures. These core–shell nanoparticles were coated with silica on their outer shell to form a second shell layer. This outer silica shell prevented aggregation during calcination. The samples were characterized by TEM, SEM, dynamic light scattering (DLS), UV/Vis spectroscopy, and by using the Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) method. The as-synthesized hollow carbon nanoparticles exhibited a high surface area (1123 m2 g−1) and formed stable dispersions in water after the pegylation process. The drug-loading and drug-release properties of these hollow carbon nanocapsules were also investigated.

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