Chemistry – An Asian Journal

Cover image for Vol. 8 Issue 8

Special Issue: Conference Issue: 15th Asian Chemical Congress

August 2013

Volume 8, Issue 8

Pages 1601–1921

  1. Cover Pictures

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Back Picture
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Focus Reviews
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Cover Picture: From Singapore to the World: The 15th Asian Chemical Congress (Chem. Asian J. 8/2013) (page 1601)

      Dr. Theresa Kueckmann

      Article first published online: 26 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/asia.201390024

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      The 15th Asian Chemical Congress will take place in Singapore this year, the place of its inception. This issue of Chemistry-An Asian Journal is a special issue dedicated to the occasion. It features top contributions from a selection of invited conference speakers from around the world, and includes Focus Reviews on fullerene nanoarchitectonics and cucurbit[8]uril-based polymers, as well as 23 original research papers. The cover picture shows the merlion, a popular icon of Singapore, roaring to the world about the great chemistry in this issue.

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      Inside Cover: Charge-Transfer Interaction between Few-Layer MoS2 and Tetrathiafulvalene (Chem. Asian J. 8/2013) (page 1602)

      Sunita Dey, H. S. S. Ramakrishna Matte, Sharmila N. Shirodkar, Prof. Umesh V. Waghmare and Prof. C. N. R. Rao

      Article first published online: 26 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/asia.201390025

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      Layered Compounds Interaction of electron donor and acceptor molecules with graphene and carbon nanotubes brings about major changes in the electronic structure and properties of these nanocarbons. In their Communication on page 1780 ff. (highlighted on the Inside Cover), C. N. R. Rao et al. report that an electron donor such as tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) transfers an electron to graphene-like few-layer MoS2, thus resulting in the formation of the TTF radical cation (TTF+.). This interaction with TTF significantly changes the band gap of MoS2. By contrast, the electron acceptor tetracyanoethylene does not interact with MoS2 as it is a p-type material.

  2. Back Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Back Picture
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Focus Reviews
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    1. Back Cover: Widely Applicable Synthesis of Enantiomerically Pure Tertiary Alkyl-Containing 1-Alkanols by Zirconium-Catalyzed Asymmetric Carboalumination of Alkenes and Palladium- or Copper-Catalyzed Cross-Coupling (Chem. Asian J. 8/2013) (pages 1602–1924)

      Dr. Shiqing Xu, Dr. Ching-Tien Lee, Dr. Guangwei Wang and Prof. Dr. Ei-ichi Negishi

      Article first published online: 26 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/asia.201390028

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      Asymmetric Synthesis A highly enantioselective and widely applicable method for the synthesis of various chiral 2-alkyl-1-alkanols, especially those of feeble chirality, has been developed by Ei-ichi Negishi et al. In their Full Paper on page 1829 ff., featured on the Back Cover, the authors report that the (S)- or (R)-enantiomer of 3-iodo-2-alkyl-1-alkanols (1), prepared by the zirconium-catalyzed asymmetric carboalumination of alkenes (ZACA) reaction of allyl alcohol, can be readily purified to the ≥99% ee level by lipase-catalyzed acetylation. Thus, a variety of chiral 2-alkyl-1-alkanols can now be synthesized in high enantiomeric purity (≥99% ee) by Pd- or Cu-catalyzed cross-coupling of (S)-1 or (R)-2 for introduction of various primary, secondary, and tertiary carbon groups with essentially no enantiomeric isomerization.

  3. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Back Picture
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Focus Reviews
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
  4. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Back Picture
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Focus Reviews
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    1. Graphical Abstract: Chem. Asian J. 8/2013 (pages 1607–1617)

      Article first published online: 26 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/asia.201390026

  5. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Back Picture
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Focus Reviews
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
  6. Focus Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Back Picture
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Focus Reviews
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    1. Supramolecular Chemistry

      Cucurbit[8]uril-Based Supramolecular Polymers (pages 1626–1632)

      Yiliu Liu, Dr. Hui Yang, Prof. Zhiqiang Wang and Prof. Xi Zhang

      Article first published online: 15 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/asia.201300151

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      Sk[8]er boi: Cucurbit[8]uril-based host–guest interactions are described, with a special emphasis on the fabrication of supramolecular polymers, including small-molecule-based supramolecular polymers and polymer-based supramolecular polymers.

    2. Polymerization

      RAFT Polymerization and Some of its Applications (pages 1634–1644)

      Dr. Graeme Moad, Dr. Ezio Rizzardo and Dr. San H. Thang

      Article first published online: 18 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/asia.201300262

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      Enjoy the RAFTing tour: Reversible addition–fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) is one of the most robust and versatile methods for controlling radical polymerization to produce low dispersity polymers with well-defined architecture and composition. Applications described in this review include polymers for optoelectronics, block copolymer therapeutics, and star polymer rheology control agents.

    3. Metalloenzymes

      Artificial Metalloenzymes Constructed From Hierarchically-Assembled Proteins (pages 1646–1660)

      Prof. Takafumi Ueno, Hiroyasu Tabe and Dr. Yuya Tanaka

      Article first published online: 22 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/asia.201300347

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      I am still just a cat. in the cage: The most significant recent research in the field of artificial metalloenzymes is reviewed with a commentary on future directions. In particular, the review is focused on the potential of protein assemblies such as protein cages and crystals composed of assemblies of protein monomers in efforts to design unique catalytic metal complex systems or metal nanoparticles beyond finely tuned small artificial metalloproteins.

    4. Fullerenes

      Fullerene Nanoarchitectonics: From Zero to Higher Dimensions (pages 1662–1679)

      Dr. Lok Kumar Shrestha, Dr. Qingmin Ji, Dr. Taizo Mori, Dr. Kun'ichi Miyazawa, Prof. Yusuke Yamauchi, Dr. Jonathan P. Hill and Prof. Katsuhiko Ariga

      Article first published online: 15 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/asia.201300247

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      Zero to hero: Because fullerenes can be regarded as ideal zero-dimensional (0D) functional building units, the construction of higher-dimensional objects from fullerenes, that is, 1D, 2D, and 3D nanomaterials, can facilitate powerful aspects of nanoarchitectonics. This Focus Review summarizes recent developments in the production of nanostructured fullerenes and in techniques to elaborate fullerene nanomaterials into hierarchical structures.

    5. CO2 Capture and Storage

      Nitrogen-Rich Porous Adsorbents for CO2 Capture and Storage (pages 1680–1691)

      Dr. Pei-Zhou Li and Prof. Dr. Yanli Zhao

      Article first published online: 6 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/asia.201300121

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      Ways to get (N)-rich: The construction of physical and chemical adsorbents for CO2 capture and sequestration (CCS) is a vital technology on the way towards a sustainable low-carbon future. Nitrogen-rich porous materials including amine-functionalized porous silica, nitrogen-rich porous carbons, nitrogen-rich metal-organic frameworks, and nitrogen-rich porous organic polymers have been emerging as cost-effective and energy-efficient adsorbents for CCS. This review highlights recent progress in the fabrication and application of nitrogen-rich porous materials for CCS.

    6. Metal–Organic Frameworks

      Recent Advances in Metal–Organic Framework-Based Mixed Matrix Membranes (pages 1692–1704)

      Ilknur Erucar, Gamze Yilmaz and Prof. Seda Keskin

      Article first published online: 25 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/asia.201300084

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      Trapped in the matrix: Metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) have been recently used as filler particles in mixed matrix membranes (MMMs), and significant improvements have been reported for gas selectivity and gas permeability in these MOF-based membranes (see figure). This review covers the opportunities and challenges of MOF-based MMMs in gas-separation applications.

    7. Solar Cells

      Squaraine Dyes for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells: Recent Advances and Future Challenges (pages 1706–1719)

      Dr. Chuanjiang Qin, Prof. Wai-Yeung Wong and Dr. Liyuan Han

      Article first published online: 17 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/asia.201300185

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      Toward NIR response: Recent progress in squaraine dyes has led to a rapid increase in the energy conversion efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells. Squaraine dyes are also a promising candidate as near-infrared (NIR) co-sensitizers in co-sensitized solar cells. In this Focus Review, we highlight some recent advances of squaraine sensitizers and their applications in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    8. Multidentate Ligands

      Recent Developments in the Coordination Chemistry of Multidentate Ligands Featuring a Boron Moiety (pages 1720–1734)

      Dr. Hajime Kameo and Prof. Hiroshi Nakazawa

      Article first published online: 4 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/asia.201300184

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      Cooperation and coordination: Recently, the study of the synergistic effect between transition metals and boron has become easier owing to the development of various rigid multidentate frameworks. In this Review, we mainly focus on the chemistry of σ-acceptor (Z-type) borane ligands, in particular, the key achievements of their unique reactivity and catalytic applications. The unique coordination chemistry augmented by boryl-based chelating ligands is also summarized.

    9. Functional Materials

      Polymer Brushes: Promises and Challenges (pages 1736–1753)

      Prof. Dr. Basit Yameen and Aleeza Farrukh

      Article first published online: 2 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/asia.201300149

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      Bedknobs and broomsticks: This Focus Review discusses the current status in the development of synthetic procedures, recently explored substrates, innovative applications, and the accompanying challenges of surface-grafted macromolecular assemblies.

  7. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Back Picture
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Focus Reviews
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    1. OLEDs

      Highly Efficient Solution-Processable Organic Light-Emitting Devices with Pincer-Type Cyclometalated Platinum(II) Arylacetylide Complexes (pages 1754–1759)

      Dr. Gang Cheng, Prof. Yong Chen, Prof. Chuluo Yang, Prof. Wei Lu and Prof. Chi-Ming Che

      Article first published online: 6 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/asia.201201146

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      Let your light shine: By using pincer-type cyclometalated PtII arylacetylide complexes as dopants, a maximum current efficiency of 26.57 cd A−1 (22.12 cd A−1 at 1000 cd m−2) has been achieved with solution-processable phosphorescent OLEDs, the highest ever reported for this type of devices based on phosphorescent PtII emitters.

    2. Gene Delivery

      Increased Efficacies in Magnetofection and Gene Delivery to Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells with Ternary Organic–Inorganic Hybrid Nanocomposites (pages 1760–1764)

      Prof. Dr. Ken Cham-Fai Leung, Dr. Chun-Pong Chak, Siu-Fung Lee, Josie M. Y. Lai, Dr. Xiao-Ming Zhu, Prof. Dr. Yi-Xiang J. Wang, Kathy W. Y. Sham, Chi-Hin Wong and Prof. Dr. Christopher H. K. Cheng

      Article first published online: 31 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/asia.201300202

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      A magnetic personality: Magnetofection and gene delivery have been investigated in HepG2 cells using ternary organic–inorganic hybrid nanocomposites that contain deferoxamine-coated iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs), circular plasmid DNA, and branched polyethylenimine (PEI). It was found that the cellular uptake efficacies depend on the ratio of components in PEI/DNA/NP, as assessed by Prussian staining, magnetic resonance imaging, and luciferase expression in the presence and absence of a magnet during transfection.

    3. Supraparticles

      Bioinspired Synthesis of ZnS Supraparticles toward Photoinduced Dechlorination of 2,2′,4,4′,5,5′-Hexachlorobiphenyl (pages 1765–1767)

      Liangcan He, Yansong Xiong, Meiting Zhao, Xiang Mao, Prof. Yaling Liu, Prof. Huijun Zhao and Prof. Zhiyong Tang

      Article first published online: 31 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/asia.201300277

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      All you need is a little inspiration: Inspired by nature, a green and low-cost synthetic method was developed to prepare monodisperse ZnS supraparticles (SPs) with the zinc-blende structure at 37.0 °C. The prepared ZnS SPs can be used as catalysts for the photoinduced dechlorination of 2,2′,4,4′,5,5′-hexachlorobiphenyl. A degradation efficiency of about 70 % was obtained under irradiation with UV light for 12 hours.

    4. Spiro Compounds

      Catalytic Asymmetric Synthesis of Spirooxindoles via Addition of Isothiocyanato Oxindoles to Aldehydes Under Dinuclear Nickel Schiff Base Catalysis (pages 1768–1771)

      Shota Kato, Prof. Dr. Motomu Kanai and Dr. Shigeki Matsunaga

      Article first published online: 15 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/asia.201300251

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      One-step approach: A homodinuclear nickel Schiff base catalyst was utilized for the title reaction, thus providing easy access to spirocyclic oxindole compounds in one step. High enantioselectivity as well as high catalyst turnover number (TON, up to 850) were achieved at ambient temperature.

    5. Single-Molecule Magnets

      Assembly of {Mn2(salen)2}2+ Dimers by Cyclic V4O124− Clusters: A 3 D Compound with Open-Framework Structure Exhibiting Slow Magnetization Relaxation (pages 1772–1775)

      Ting-Ting Wang, Dr. Song-Song Bao, Min Ren, Zhong-Sheng Cai, Ze-Hua Zheng, Zhong-Li Xu and Prof. Dr. Li-Min Zheng

      Article first published online: 3 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/asia.201300167

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      Sit back and relax: The title compound [Mn6(salen)6(H2O)V4O12](ClO4)2⋅7 H2O is the first example of a 3D coordination polymer with embedded out-of-plane MnIII Schiff base dimers, where the Mn2(salen)22+ dimers are connected by the cyclic V4O124− clusters through covalent bonds. Slow magnetization relaxation is observed at low temperature.

    6. Domino Reactions

      New Entry to Polycyclic Fused Indoles via Gold(I)-catalyzed Cascade Reaction (pages 1776–1779)

      Dr. Michel Chiarucci, Elia Matteucci, Gianpiero Cera, Prof. Giancarlo Fabrizi and Prof. Marco Bandini

      Article first published online: 14 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/asia.201201249

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      The gold standard: A gold-catalyzed cascade reaction sequence for the preparation of polycyclic fused indole cores exploits the ready availability and chemical flexibility of propargylic alcohols. The desired tri- or tetracyclic compounds are obtained in good yields with water as the only stoichiometric by-product.

    7. Layered Compounds

      Charge-Transfer Interaction between Few-Layer MoS2 and Tetrathiafulvalene (pages 1780–1784)

      Sunita Dey, H. S. S. Ramakrishna Matte, Sharmila N. Shirodkar, Prof. Umesh V. Waghmare and Prof. C. N. R. Rao

      Article first published online: 16 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/asia.201300174

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      Graphene look-alike: MoS2 has a layered structure similar to graphene. Tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) interacts with thin, few-layer MoS2 material by donating an electron, resulting in the formation of TTF radical cation and n-type doping of MoS2. Electron-withdrawing tetracyanoethylene, in contrast, does not cause p-type doping in MoS2.

  8. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Back Picture
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Focus Reviews
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    1. Sigmatropic Rearrangement

      [3,3]-Sigmatropic Rearrangement Step in the Gold-Catalyzed Cyclization of Allyl-(ortho-alkinylphenyl)methyl Ethers (pages 1786–1794)

      Dr. Martin Ackermann, Janina Bucher, Melissa Rappold, Katharina Graf, Dr. Frank Rominger and Prof. Dr. A. Stephen K. Hashmi

      Article first published online: 31 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/asia.201300324

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      The Golden Key: Allylic inversion and crossover experiments reveal a sigmatropic rearrangement as a key step in the gold-catalyzed intramolecular allyl transfer in ortho-alkinyl benzyl allyl ethers.

    2. Solvent Effects

      Solvent-Dependent Reversible Ligand Exchange in Nickel Complexes of a Monosulfide Bis(diphenylphosphino)(N-thioether)amine (pages 1795–1805)

      Alessio Ghisolfi, Dr. Christophe Fliedel, Dr. Vitor Rosa, Dr. Roberto Pattacini, Dr. Aurore Thibon, Dr. Kirill Yu. Monakhov and Prof. Pierre Braunstein

      Article first published online: 21 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/asia.201300687

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      Swap deal: Easy migration of a P,S-chelating ligand to form five-membered rings in NiII complexes accounts for the reversible ligand redistribution that occurs in the equilibrium between the neutral complex [NiCl2LL′] and the ion-pair [Ni(LL′)2][NiCl4].

    3. Fluorescent Probes

      Water-Soluble Tetraphenylethene Derivatives as Fluorescent “Light-Up” Probes for Nucleic Acid Detection and Their Applications in Cell Imaging (pages 1806–1812)

      Dr. Yuning Hong, Sijie Chen, Chris Wai Tung Leung, Dr. Jacky Wing Yip Lam and Prof. Ben Zhong Tang

      Article first published online: 17 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/asia.201300065

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      Nucleic acids stand out: Cationic tetraphenylethenes selectively light up nucleic acids by fluorescence and thus can be applied for DNA/RNA quantitation and visualization, chromosome staining, and differentiation of live/dead cells (see figure).

    4. Self-Assembly

      Self-Assembly of a Halogenated Molecule on Oxide-Passivated Cu(110) (pages 1813–1817)

      Dr. Mohamed El Garah, Dr. Josh Lipton-Duffin, Dr. Jennifer M. MacLeod, Dr. Rico Gutzler, Prof. Dr. Frank Palmino, Vincent Luzet, Dr. Frédéric Chérioux and Prof. Dr. Federico Rosei

      Article first published online: 11 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/asia.201300283

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      Passive resistance: The supramolecular self-assembly of halogenated molecules is achieved on an oxide-passivated Cu(110) surface by tuning the molecule–surface interactions. The Cu(110)[BOND]O(2×1) oxygen atoms do not undergo Ullmann cross-coupling reactions, although this reaction is catalyzed by a bare Cu surface, instead suppressing molecule–molecule interactions.

    5. Proteomics

      Cell-Based Proteome Profiling Using an Affinity-Based Probe (AfBP) Derived from 3-Deazaneplanocin A () (pages 1818–1828)

      Dr. Eric K. W. Tam, Dr. Zhengqiu Li, Yi Ling Goh, Xiamin Cheng, Sze Yue Wong, Dr. Sridhar Santhanakrishnan, Prof. Dr. Christina L. L. Chai and Prof. Dr. Shao Q. Yao

      Article first published online: 7 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/asia.201300303

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      Fishing for targets: A designer DzNep-like ‘bait’ for in-vitro and in-situ protein profiling and target identification is presented. The results revealed some highly enriched proteins that were previously unknown DzNep targets.

    6. Asymmetric Synthesis

      Widely Applicable Synthesis of Enantiomerically Pure Tertiary Alkyl-Containing 1-Alkanols by Zirconium-Catalyzed Asymmetric Carboalumination of Alkenes and Palladium- or Copper-Catalyzed Cross-Coupling (pages 1829–1835)

      Dr. Shiqing Xu, Dr. Ching-Tien Lee, Dr. Guangwei Wang and Prof. Dr. Ei-ichi Negishi

      Article first published online: 13 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/asia.201300311

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      Look, mom, one hand! 2-Alkyl-1-alkanols of feeble chirality have been synthesized by a sequence of zirconium-catalyzed asymmetric carboalumination of alkenes (ZACA), lipase-catalyzed acetylation, and Pd- or Cu-catalyzed cross-coupling in high enantiomeric purity of ≥99 % ee. The synthetic utility of this method has been demonstrated in highly enantioselective and efficient syntheses of (R)-2-methyl-1-butanol, (R)- and (S)-arundic acids.

    7. Nonlinear Optics

      Further Enhancement of the Second-Order Nonlinear Optical (NLO) Coefficient and the Stability of NLO Polymers that Contain Isolation Chromophore Moieties by Using the “Suitable Isolation Group” Concept and the Ar/ArF Self-Assembly Effect (pages 1836–1846)

      Wenbo Wu, Prof. Cheng Ye, Prof. Jingui Qin and Prof. Zhen Li

      Article first published online: 25 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/asia.201300010

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      Second the best: Second-order NLO poly(arylene-ethynylene)s that contained an isolation chromophore were obtained, in which the isolation groups were introduced by using the “suitable isolation group” concept or the Ar[BOND]ArF self-assembly effect.

    8. Nanostructures

      Formation of Ag2S Cages from Polyhedral Ag2O Nanocrystals and their Electrochemical Properties (pages 1847–1853)

      Dr. Lian-Ming Lyu and Prof. Michael H. Huang

      Article first published online: 28 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/asia.201300066

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      Be on etch: Large polyhedral Ag2S cages (bottom) with thin shells can be readily obtained by first forming a sulfide layer over various polyhedral Ag2O crystal templates (top) such as cubes, octahedra, and hexapods through a rapid sulfidation process, and subsequent treatment with an ammonia solution to remove the Ag2O cores; the Ag2S cages retain the morphologies of the original templates (scale bar=500 nm).

    9. Copolymerization

      Microstructure Analysis of a CO2 Copolymer from Styrene Oxide at the Diad Level (pages 1854–1862)

      Guang-Peng Wu, Yu-Ping Zu, Peng-Xiang Xu, Wei-Min Ren and Prof. Dr. Xiao-Bing Lu

      Article first published online: 24 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/asia.201300115

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      T-T races: The spectroscopic assignment of regio- and stereoregular poly(styrene carbonate)s at the diad level was performed by 13C NMR studies of three kinds of model compounds, as well as their syndiotactic (R,S) and isotactic (R,R or S,S) dimers.

    10. Self-Assembly

      Interconvertible Self-Assembly and Rheological Properties of Planar Bilayers and Vesicle Gels in Anionic/Nonionic (CF/CH) Surfactant Solutions (pages 1863–1872)

      Renhao Dong, Jing Wu, Prof. Dr. Shuli Dong, Dr. Shasha Song, Dr. Feng Tian and Prof. Dr. Jingcheng Hao

      Article first published online: 9 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/asia.201300134

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      Avengers self-assemble: The interconvertible self-assembly of planar bilayers and vesicle gels was achieved in anionic/nonionic (CF/CH) surfactant solutions, which could be of practical use for controlled drug delivery and release.

    11. Metal–Organic Frameworks

      Facile Synthesis of Aluminum-Based Metal–Organic Frameworks with Different Morphologies and Structures through an OH-Assisted Method (pages 1873–1878)

      Yichao Lin, Prof. Chunlong Kong and Prof. Liang Chen

      Article first published online: 24 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/asia.201300135

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      Taken with a pinch of salt: Metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) with different structures and morphologies were synthesized by tuning the OH ion content in the synthesis solution. MIL-96 crystals with dodecahedral and hexagonal columnar shapes, and nanorod-shaped MIL-110 were obtained (see picture).

    12. Functional Zeolitic-Imidazolate-Framework-Templated Porous Carbon Materials for CO2 Capture and Enhanced Capacitors (pages 1879–1885)

      Qingfei Wang, Wei Xia, Wenhan Guo, Li An, Prof. Dingguo Xia and Prof. Ruqiang Zou

      Article first published online: 9 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/asia.201300147

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      Rich man, pore man: Three types of nanoporous carbon materials were templated by zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIFs). The chloride group on the benzimidazolate ligand improves the CO2 capture and supercapacitor properties of the porous materials.

    13. Carboranes

      Reactions of 13-Vertex Carboranes with Strong Bases: Synthesis and Structural Characterization of Carborane Monoanions with exo-π Bonding (pages 1886–1891)

      Fangrui Zheng, Dr. Jian Zhang, Xiaodu Fu and Prof. Dr. Zuowei Xie

      Article first published online: 15 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/asia.201300240

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      Unlucky for some: 13-Vertex carborane monoanions with exo C[DOUBLE BOND]C π bonding to hypercarbon atoms were characterized by deprotonation of their α-methylene atoms. These monoanions had the same cage geometry as their parent neutral molecules.

    14. Organic Solar Cells

      Oligothiophene-Bridged Bis(arylene ethynylene) Small Molecules for Solution-Processible Organic Solar Cells with High Open-Circuit Voltage (pages 1892–1900)

      Qian Liu, Dr. Hongmei Zhan, Dr. Cheuk-Lam Ho, Dr. Feng-Rong Dai, Yingying Fu, Prof. Zhiyuan Xie, Prof. Lixiang Wang, Jin-Hua Li, Prof. Feng Yan, Dr. Shu-Ping Huang and Prof. Wai-Yeung Wong

      Article first published online: 6 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/asia.201300244

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      Building bridges: New oligothiophene-bridged bis(arylene ethynylene) small molecules (see picture) are developed and applied in solution-processed organic solar cells. All of these photovoltaic devices showed very high open-circuit voltage of over 0.90 V, and the best power conversion efficiency achieved was 3.68 %.

    15. Molecular Electronics

      Conformation-Controlled Electron Transport in Single-Molecule Junctions Containing Oligo(phenylene ethynylene) Derivatives (pages 1901–1909)

      Dr. Le-Jia Wang, Dr. Ai Yong, Dr. Kai-Ge Zhou, Dr. Lin Tan, Dr. Jian Ye, Dr. Guo-Ping Wu, Prof. Zhu-Guo Xu and Prof. Hao-Li Zhang

      Article first published online: 31 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/asia.201300264

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      Control issues: We present the first investigation on the torsion-angle dependence of molecular junctions beyond a simple biphenyl system. Experimental and theoretical results suggest that the conductance of OPE molecular junctions are strongly affected by the coupling strength between the two phenyl–ethynyl–phenyl π systems, which can be tuned by controlling their intramolecular conformation.

    16. Bioorganic Chemistry

      Inhibition of Lactoperoxidase-Catalyzed Oxidation by Imidazole-Based Thiones and Selones: A Mechanistic Study (pages 1910–1921)

      Dr. Gouriprasanna Roy, P. N. Jayaram and Prof. Dr. Govindasamy Mugesh

      Article first published online: 4 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/asia.201300274

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      Stop, in the name of love: The inhibition of lactoperoxidase (LPO)-catalyzed reactions by a series of N,N-disubstituted thiones and selones that contain an imidazole pharmacophore is described. The inhibitory activity not only depends on the substituent that is attached to the nitrogen atom, but also on the nature of the chalcogen atom. The inhibition of LPO activity by selones is due to their ability to scavenge the substrate, hydrogen peroxide.

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